Veterans charity – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:03:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T112559.751-150x150.jpg Veterans charity – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ 32 32 Commonwealth veterans’ charity announces plans to close after 100 years https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/commonwealth-veterans-charity-announces-plans-to-close-after-100-years/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 12:10:05 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/commonwealth-veterans-charity-announces-plans-to-close-after-100-years/ A century-old charity for Commonwealth veterans has announced plans to close over the next decade when its last surviving beneficiaries die. The Royal Commonwealth Ex-Services League (RCEL) has been distributing money to pre-independence veterans across the Commonwealth since 1921. Using a network of former military representatives, they aim to provide two meals a day to […]]]>

A century-old charity for Commonwealth veterans has announced plans to close over the next decade when its last surviving beneficiaries die.

The Royal Commonwealth Ex-Services League (RCEL) has been distributing money to pre-independence veterans across the Commonwealth since 1921.

Using a network of former military representatives, they aim to provide two meals a day to Commonwealth veterans who served the Crown, or their widows, who live in poverty overseas.

With many of its beneficiaries now aged 90 or over, the RCEL expects to close within the next ten years when its last surviving beneficiaries die.

Funding for Foreign, Commonwealth & Development Office (FCDO) grants is due to end in March 2024.

Although it plans to close within ten years, the association is asking for additional financial support to prevent many of its beneficiaries from dying “of malnutrition and poverty”.

End of public funding in 2024

More than 4.4 million Commonwealth servicemen and women from the Indian subcontinent, Africa and the Caribbean fought in World War II, claiming 360,000 casualties.

This year, the RCEL has helped 5,000 war veterans and widows in 37 countries, including Commonwealth countries and former Commonwealth countries before independence, through social workers who carry out assessments and distribute aid social.

Chris Warren, general secretary of the RCEL, said funding for the FCDO grants was due to end in March 2024, although the charity still had “vital work to do”.

“In many ways, our work is more important than ever, as our beneficiaries enter the evening of their lives. Until the last dies, in partnership with service charities, and we hope for an extension of the government funding program, we will work to ensure that no overseas resident who has served in our armed forces has what to eat.

“Without additional financial support, the consequences will mean that many, more than half of whom are widows, will die of malnutrition and poverty. They came to support us in our hour of need, and we must continue to remember them in their hour of need.

“We must continue to work to prevent starvation, malnutrition and improve their quality of life through healthy food. The WWII generation is aging and in need of support as few countries have a national healthcare system similar to our NHS. The need to ensure the security of the food supply to some of the most disadvantaged people in the world is perhaps more important today than it was when we started 100 years ago.

Warren also paid tribute to the Queen, a patron of the charity, saying she ‘showed a personal interest throughout her life and there is no doubt her involvement has helped bring out dozens of thousands of veterans of poverty”.

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Doctors will meet a veterans charity in West Bromwich to improve healthcare for veterans https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/doctors-will-meet-a-veterans-charity-in-west-bromwich-to-improve-healthcare-for-veterans/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:31:10 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/doctors-will-meet-a-veterans-charity-in-west-bromwich-to-improve-healthcare-for-veterans/ Blind Veteran Simon Brown GPs will receive interviews from military charities about their area of ​​specialty before speaking directly to veterans. Blind Veterans UK will be represented by Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers veteran Simon Brown, who lost his sight when he was shot in the face by a sniper while serving in Iraq. Army […]]]>
Blind Veteran Simon Brown

GPs will receive interviews from military charities about their area of ​​specialty before speaking directly to veterans.

Blind Veterans UK will be represented by Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers veteran Simon Brown, who lost his sight when he was shot in the face by a sniper while serving in Iraq.

Army General Practitioner and MOD Clinical Director of Overseas Health Care Colonel Julian Woodhouse first began similar talks in 2015 after veterans care was added to the GP program . Since then, more than 5,000 GPs have received training at more than 100 events across the country.

Colonel Woodhouse said: “There are as many veterans in this country as there are diabetics. And our veterans have unique health care needs that must be addressed. These events help doctors GPs to learn to support veterans and speak their language.

“The feedback from GPs has been excellent and in 2017 we even won an award for innovation in training from the Royal College of General Practitioners. After interrupting sessions during the pandemic, I look forward to hearing Simon speak again. He’s a class act and the most effective communicator I’ve ever encountered.”

Simon Brown, representing Blind Veterans UK, said: “I’m proud to have supported this event from the very start. It’s so important that we make our GPs aware of veterans’ issues and these events do just that. The veteran community is more than happy to work with the healthcare industry to help them, help us and work closely together.”

Simon joined the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers in 1997. During his career he worked as a vehicle mechanic for the service and maintenance of army vehicles, serving in Germany, Kosovo, Poland, the Canada and Iraq.

In 2006, while a corporal, he led a successful mission to recover six colleagues stranded in Iraq. He was hit in the face by a sniper, the bullet entered his left cheek and came out the other side. Fortunately, he was not knocked out and was able to perform first aid for 25 minutes. His colleagues rushed him to Basra Palace, where he was put into an artificial coma.

Simon woke up 17 days later in a Birmingham hospital. He had lost his left eye and had to undergo several intensive operations to reconstruct his cheeks and nose. Simon ended up with about 20% vision in his right eye.

Simon said: “When I found out I had lost my sight, my world fell apart. I had lost my career, I had lost my job and I had lost my future. Luckily for Simon, he found the charity Blind Veterans UK later that year and started getting the support he needed.

“When I first started with Blind Veterans UK, the education and peer support was invaluable. It boosted my confidence and gave me the pragmatic support I needed to move forward. learned to use email again, I learned to cook meals on my own, things that most people take for granted.”

Blind Veterans UK supports thousands of blind veterans across the country, but the charity knows many thousands more still need its support to rebuild their lives after losing their sight.

For more information about Blind Veterans UK call 0800 389 7979 or visit blindveterans.org.uk/support.

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Scotland’s largest veterans’ charity launches new sculpture trail in Erskine Veterans’ Village Park https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/scotlands-largest-veterans-charity-launches-new-sculpture-trail-in-erskine-veterans-village-park/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 01:34:20 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/scotlands-largest-veterans-charity-launches-new-sculpture-trail-in-erskine-veterans-village-park/ Scotland’s largest veterans’ charity, in partnership with creative organization Luminate, has launched the Erskine Sculpture Trail on the grounds of Erskine’s Veterans Village in Bishopton. The trail consists of 10 sculptures, created by artists-in-residence Gill White and James Winnett in collaboration with Erskine residents and launched on August 31. Nestled among the trees in the […]]]>

Scotland’s largest veterans’ charity, in partnership with creative organization Luminate, has launched the Erskine Sculpture Trail on the grounds of Erskine’s Veterans Village in Bishopton.

The trail consists of 10 sculptures, created by artists-in-residence Gill White and James Winnett in collaboration with Erskine residents and launched on August 31.

Nestled among the trees in the peaceful surroundings of the Erskine Estate, the Sculpture Trail is a testament to the creativity and joy that residents experience in working alongside artists to create a lasting exhibit. The sculptures are inspired by nature, memories and stories of the people of Erskine, to create an interactive experience.

The Luminate project was designed with the aim of engaging in new ways with locals and showcasing artistic talent. Luminate and Erskine have worked together since 2017, originally through a program called Unforgotten Forces, a partnership of 16 charities supporting elderly veterans across Scotland.

James and Gill were the first resident artists and worked closely with Erskine residents on a wide range of creative pursuits, from photography to poetry and soundscapes to painting. Although interrupted by the pandemic, they returned to Erskine in the summer of 2021 to complete the art trail project.


Photo: The trail consists of 10 sculptures nestled among the trees in the peaceful setting of the Erskine Estate
Photo credit: Jamie Williamson


Photo: Artists Erskine at the Gill White and James Winnett Residence
Photo credit: Jamie Williamson

Creative activities, like the ones Gill and James brought to Erskine, play a valuable role in resident care. Participants reveled in the true sense of accomplishment that these new activities brought them.

Derek Barron, Director of Care at Erskine, said: “Today’s unveiling of the Erskine Sculpture Trail reminds us of the many happy hours our residents, from our four homes, have experienced during their time with our very first artists in residence, Gill and Jacques Our residents all have different abilities and live with things that impact them, whether it’s living with dementia, reduced mobility or loss of autonomy or trust.

“Erskine has always had an extensive program of social and recreational activities to support the well-being of residents, but we lacked the expertise on art and artistic expression that Gill and James provided. Working with Luminate, Gill and James have brought to Erskine such a comprehensive and colorful range of arts activities that our residents love.

Anne Gallacher, Director of Luminate, said, “Collaborating with Erskine residents and staff has been a joyous experience not only for artists Gill White and James Winnett, but for all of us at Luminate. The stories, experiences and creativity shared by everyone involved in the project have been inspiring. There is growing evidence of the positive impact of the arts and creativity as we age, and Luminate’s work across Scotland shows the important contribution professional artists can make to quality of life. and well-being of the elderly. The Erskine Sculpture Trail is a wonderful example of the creativity that can be sparked when artists and care home communities come together.

Artist-in-Residence Gill White said, “James Winnett and I have created ‘Art Adventures in Nature’ which celebrates the world around us by fostering playful exploration and outdoor creativity. We came up with the idea of ​​creating a sculpture trail in the forest to encourage a place where residents, staff and locals can meet, be active and explore different works of art embedded in the natural landscape.

“It was a real pleasure to spend time with each resident learning about their lives and tailoring each workshop to their interests with an emphasis on creating a fun and relaxed environment to learn new processes and embrace the exploratory nature of creativity. We had a lot of fun together and I found time spent with Erskine residents, loved ones and staff to be a very happy and rewarding experience, both personally and creatively.

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Scooter’s Presents $64,000 Donation to Veterans Charity | Gretna https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/scooters-presents-64000-donation-to-veterans-charity-gretna/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/scooters-presents-64000-donation-to-veterans-charity-gretna/ Scooter’s Coffee donated $64,546 to Wounded Warriors Family Support on September 1. Collected between August 3-12 as part of Purple Heart Day, Scooter’s Coffee asked customers to add $1 or more to their order, with proceeds going to WWFS and its mission to provide resources and valuable programs for veterans injured in action and the […]]]>

Scooter’s Coffee donated $64,546 to Wounded Warriors Family Support on September 1.

Collected between August 3-12 as part of Purple Heart Day, Scooter’s Coffee asked customers to add $1 or more to their order, with proceeds going to WWFS and its mission to provide resources and valuable programs for veterans injured in action and the families of veterans. injured, wounded or killed in action.

The total raised represents the generosity of Scooter customers, employees and franchises in its 27 states. This is the fifth consecutive year that the company, headquartered in Gretna, has supported WWFS and its programs that help local heroes heal, recover and achieve freedom and independence in their daily lives.

“Scooter’s Coffee is proud to support Wounded Warriors Family Support for its dedication to helping injured veterans and their families heal, recover, and connect to needed services and resources,” said Joe Thornton, president of Scooter’s Coffee, in a press release.

People also read…

WWFS offers a welding training program for veterans and provides grants and modified vehicles to veterans injured in combat through Mobility is Freedom. Since 2021, WWFS has provided 18 vehicle grants and 22 modified vehicles to injured veterans.

“We greatly appreciate our partnership with Scooter’s Coffee to support our military families,” WWFS President Kate McCauley said in a statement. “Our mission to serve combat-injured veterans and their families depends on the generosity of companies like Scooter’s Coffee. Our most sincere thanks to their customers, franchisees and employees for their continued support. »

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Veterans’ charity urges tattoo artists to accept mental health training offer https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-charity-urges-tattoo-artists-to-accept-mental-health-training-offer/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 23:01:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-charity-urges-tattoo-artists-to-accept-mental-health-training-offer/ Hairdressers and tattoo artists are being encouraged by a veterans’ charity to take a short course on how to spot and support suicidal clients. Help For Heroes said there was “ample anecdotal evidence” that salon staff often provided “informal therapy” sessions to veterans struggling with their mental health by bonding with them as part of […]]]>

Hairdressers and tattoo artists are being encouraged by a veterans’ charity to take a short course on how to spot and support suicidal clients.

Help For Heroes said there was “ample anecdotal evidence” that salon staff often provided “informal therapy” sessions to veterans struggling with their mental health by bonding with them as part of their daily work.

The charity is promoting a free 30-minute training course that anyone can access, put together by experts from The Armed Forces charity and the Zero Suicide Alliance.

Having gone through very difficult times during and after my military career, I am able to sympathize with my clients, who become friends. I think tattoo artists are perfectly placed to take this training and learn to spot the signs when someone might be struggling.

Help For Heroes said a veteran, who wished to remain anonymous, explained how a tattoo artist saved his life by bonding with him during long sessions in the salon at a time when he was contemplating suicide.

While getting tattooed to commemorate fallen soldiers, the artist admitted he had mental health issues and extended his sessions over several days – even though the piece could have been completed in a matter of hours.

The veteran said that act of kindness allowed him to work through his thoughts and ultimately saved his life.

Aaron Baillie, a retired Royal Engineer with 22 years of service and a tattoo artist for the Chesterfield, Derbyshire Veterans Community, said his sessions often served as informal therapy for clients.

Mr Baillie, who took the training, said: “I regularly tattoo serving military and veterans and most of the time the tattoo appointments almost become therapy and ventilation sessions.

Tattoo artist Aaron Baillie (Help for Heroes/PA).

“Having gone through very difficult times during and after my military career, I am able to empathize with my clients, who become friends.

“I think tattoo artists are perfectly placed to take this training and learn to spot the signs when someone might be struggling.”

Kemsley Whittlesea, another veteran turned tattoo artist, from Maidstone in Kent, also attended the training.

Mr Whittlesea, who served for 15 years before being medically discharged with a shoulder injury, said: ‘Every time I’ve been on tour I’ve ended up losing a number of my comrades , as well as friends, by suicide.

“As soon as I heard that Help For Heroes was running an awareness campaign for suicide prevention training for tattoo artists, the stars aligned and I knew I had to come on board to help out in every way. possible ways.”

Tattoo artist Kemsley Whittlesea (Help for Heroes/PA).

One in three military veterans have felt suicidal in their lifetime, according to a YouGov survey of more than 8,300 people, including 455 veterans, commissioned by Help For Heroes in July 2022.

The charity said former members of the armed forces were more likely to turn to family and friends for help than to a formal therapist.

His short training session aims to help people spot the signs of someone struggling with their mental health, including veterans, and open up conversations about it.

Help For Heroes especially urges people with roles in their communities who regularly find themselves having long conversations with clients to participate.

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Founder of charity for army veterans, 54, convicted of sexual assault after grabbing woman’s butt https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/founder-of-charity-for-army-veterans-54-convicted-of-sexual-assault-after-grabbing-womans-butt/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 15:58:01 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/founder-of-charity-for-army-veterans-54-convicted-of-sexual-assault-after-grabbing-womans-butt/ The founder of an army veterans charity was today found guilty of groping a woman’s buttocks to dare to check if she was wearing underwear. Timothy Evers, 54, sexually assaulted the woman when she posed for a photo with him at a Westminster hotel. The former royal engineer, who founded Sapper Support in 2014, was […]]]>

The founder of an army veterans charity was today found guilty of groping a woman’s buttocks to dare to check if she was wearing underwear.

Timothy Evers, 54, sexually assaulted the woman when she posed for a photo with him at a Westminster hotel.

The former royal engineer, who founded Sapper Support in 2014, was attending a charity awards event where he won the award for best new charity on October 5, 2017.

The married father-of-two, who now serves with South Yorkshire Fire and Rescue, denied the sexual assaults and told Westminster Magistrates’ Court it ‘did not happen’.

But District Judge Neeta Minhas found Evers guilty of sexual assault and released him on bail ahead of his October 5 sentencing.

The judge said of the victim: ‘I found her a compelling witness. The incident left a lasting impression on him.

A woman has claimed Timothy Evers (pictured) fondled his buttocks at a charity event in 2017. He denies sexual assault but was found guilty after a trial

Judge Minhas referenced a Twitter exchange between Evers and the victim, where he blamed “effervescence and exuberance” and said, “No malice, but also no apology.”

The judge added: “I interpret the tweet as apologizing for his actions.”

The woman told the court how Evers approached her and asked for a picture with her.

“His charity had won. I recognized him as one of the winners,” the woman said.

Evers told him to “come over here” for the picture.

‘I didn’t like it. I thought it was weird,” she said.

She said they then went to another part of the building, where she saw a large group of men on the stairs.

“I thought they wanted a group photo. They were all laughing… One of them took the picture.

‘He put his arm around me like that [indicating her waist]then puts his hand on my buttocks.

Timothy Evers (back row, far right) during an appearance on BBC Radio 2, with presenter Zoe Ball (front, right) and celebrities Richard E Grant (front, left), Lulu (front, centre) and Lee Mack (back left )

Timothy Evers (back row, far right) during an appearance on BBC Radio 2, with presenter Zoe Ball (front, right) and celebrities Richard E Grant (front, left), Lulu (front, centre) and Lee Mack (back left )

“He put his hand all around my butt and squeezed it.”

“He said ‘I just wanted to check if you were wearing panties. “”

“He then pointed to his colleagues and said ‘sorry love, they dare me to do this'”.

“I yelled at him and said ‘you have no right to do this’.

“I was trying not to cry. I had to go. I had to run. And then I cried.

She said she then went to tell someone at the event what happened.

‘I was crying and saying ‘this guy just touched my ass’

The woman added: ‘At an event like this at this time of night I guess everyone is a bit squiffy. He was not tottering.

“I went home and sat in my room. I was furious, I was crying. I was really upset.

“It occurred to me to call the police. But I did not do it.

“I felt very humiliated. I don’t like to use the word triggered, but I was very triggered to be touched by an intimate part of myself.

“I felt very angry with myself because I kept thinking about what I could have done to avoid this. I was angry with myself for walking with him and not staying where I was.

The woman said she wrote a tweet to Sapper Support who responded by saying “the exuberance and bubbly were to blame”.

“I assumed it was him. I thought it was very dismissive and unrelated to me being hurt,’ the woman said.

The victim reported the incident in 2020.

“It happened right before the #MeToo movement that was important to me,” she explained.

Evers, from Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire, who has been a firefighter for 26 years, said he founded the charity after hearing about the death of a fellow ‘sapper’ from PTSD.

The woman said she hadn't been drinking when Mr Evers approached her and asked her to 'come over here' for a picture, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

The woman said she hadn’t been drinking when Mr Evers approached her and asked her to ‘come over here’ for a picture, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

He told the court he drank a single glass of champagne at the event that night.

“It was a big deal for me. We were a very young charity. I wanted to be able to remember that,” he said.

He said he asked the woman for a photo for her social media and she agreed.

“I put my arm around his waist. I had my trophy in hand,” Evers said.

“The images were blurry, it was dark. I deleted them. I said I wasn’t going to bother her anymore.

Her attorney asked, “She says you put your hand down and squeezed her buttocks.”

Evers replied, “That didn’t happen.

He said when he saw her tweet ‘I had a stomach ache if I’m being honest.

“I was amazed that she thought we did. So I wrote an awkward response at four in the morning.

In the tweet, Evers said “too much booze and exuberance were probably to blame.” No malice, but also no excuse.

He told the court: ‘It was not an admission of guilt. It was a poorly worded tweet, early in the morning.

“I asked if any volunteers had interacted with her.”

Evers said he deleted the tweet because he had received a “torrent of abuse”.

‘It was pretty despicable. I was called a pedophile.

Prosecutor Jennifer Gatland asked Evers and asked why he used the words “sincere apology.”

“I made no apologies for anything I did. I didn’t know who did it…I thought one of my volunteers might have done it,” he replied.

Ms Gatland asked: ‘Did you delete it because you realized you admitted to touching her?’

“No, not at all,” Evers said.

Evers denied but was found guilty of sexual assault.

According to the Sapper Support website, Evers joined the Royal Engineers in 1992. After an operational tour, he joined the 33rd Engineer Regiment EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Wimbish, later serving in Bosnia. He became a firefighter after leaving the army.

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Shadow veterans minister meets head of veterans charity https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/shadow-veterans-minister-meets-head-of-veterans-charity/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 13:58:59 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/shadow-veterans-minister-meets-head-of-veterans-charity/ Veterans’ welfare was the topic of discussion when Shadow Minister for Veterans and Defense People MP Rachel Hopkins met Veterans Aid CEO Dr Hugh Milroy. The Labor MP for Luton South said afterwards: “It was very interesting to hear about Veteran’s Aid’s Welfare to Wellbeing© model and its focus on positive outcomes for veterans.” Dr […]]]>

Veterans’ welfare was the topic of discussion when Shadow Minister for Veterans and Defense People MP Rachel Hopkins met Veterans Aid CEO Dr Hugh Milroy.

The Labor MP for Luton South said afterwards: “It was very interesting to hear about Veteran’s Aid’s Welfare to Wellbeing© model and its focus on positive outcomes for veterans.”

Dr Milroy said afterwards: “I was delighted that Rachel Hopkins took the time to meet and learn more about our work with ex-servicemen and women in crisis. We had very productive discussions about this. what works and doesn’t work for our clients, and I look forward to exploring the key issues in greater depth when we meet next.”

Ms Hopkins said: ‘I look forward to visiting the charity soon, especially as it is VA’s 90th anniversary year.’

The charity operates from a central London head office/visitor center and a residential facility, New Belvedere House.

Veterans Aid was founded in the aftermath of the First World War, when the UK was in serious economic trouble and homeless veterans were sleeping on the quayside of the River Thames. The charity’s unique Welfare to Wellbeing© model, which explains much of its high success rate in preventing and treating homelessness, has been benchmarked around the world.

The Labor MP for Luton South said afterwards: “It was very interesting to hear about Veteran’s Aid’s Welfare to Wellbeing© model and its focus on positive outcomes for veterans.”

Dr Milroy said afterwards: “I was delighted that Rachel Hopkins took the time to meet and learn more about our work with ex-servicemen and women in crisis. We had very productive discussions about this. what works and doesn’t work for our clients, and I look forward to exploring the key issues in greater depth when we meet next.”

Ms Hopkins said: ‘I look forward to visiting the charity soon, especially as it is VA’s 90th anniversary year.’

The charity operates from a central London head office/visitor center and a residential facility, New Belvedere House.

Veterans Aid was founded in the aftermath of the First World War, when the UK was in serious economic trouble and homeless veterans were sleeping on the quayside of the River Thames. The charity’s unique Welfare to Wellbeing© model, which explains much of its high success rate in preventing and treating homelessness, has been benchmarked around the world.

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Founder of charity for army veterans, 54, accused of groping woman’s buttocks at awards ceremony https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/founder-of-charity-for-army-veterans-54-accused-of-groping-womans-buttocks-at-awards-ceremony/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 18:59:57 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/founder-of-charity-for-army-veterans-54-accused-of-groping-womans-buttocks-at-awards-ceremony/ A woman has claimed Timothy Evers (pictured) fondled his bum at a charity event in 2017. He denies the sexual assault The founder of a charity for army veterans groped a woman’s buttocks to dare to check if she was wearing underwear, a court heard. Timothy Evers, 54, denies sexually assaulting the woman when she […]]]>

A woman has claimed Timothy Evers (pictured) fondled his bum at a charity event in 2017. He denies the sexual assault

The founder of a charity for army veterans groped a woman’s buttocks to dare to check if she was wearing underwear, a court heard.

Timothy Evers, 54, denies sexually assaulting the woman when she posed for a photo with him at a hotel in Westminster, London.

The former royal engineer, who founded Sapper Support in 2014, attended a charity awards show on October 5, 2017, where he won the award for best new charity.

The woman said she had not been drinking when Mr Evers approached her and asked her to ‘come over here’ for a photograph, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

‘I didn’t like it. I thought it was weird,” she said.

She said they then went to another part of the building, where she saw a large group of people on the stairs.

“I thought they wanted a group photo. They were all laughing and watching him take a picture of me.

“One of them took the photo.

‘He put his arm around me like that [indicating her waist], then puts his hand on my buttocks. He put his hand all around my ass and squeezed it.

The woman claims that Mr. Evers then told her that he had tried to check whether she was wearing underwear at the challenge of his colleagues.

She continued: “I yelled at him and said ‘you have no right to do this'”. I was trying not to cry. I had to go. I had to flee. And then I cried.

She said she then went to tell someone at the event what happened.

“I was crying and saying ‘this guy just touched my ass,'” she said.

The woman added: ‘At an event like this at this time of night I guess everyone is a bit squiffy. He was not tottering.

“I went home and sat in my room. I was furious, I was crying. I was really upset. It occurred to me to call the police. But I did not do it.

“I felt very humiliated. I don’t like to use the word triggered, but I was very triggered to be touched by an intimate part of myself.

“I felt very angry with myself because I kept thinking about what I could have done to avoid this. I was angry with myself for walking with him and not staying where I was.

When she later complained about the incident to Sapper Support, they responded by saying “the exuberance and bubbly were to blame”.

“I assumed it was him. I thought it was very dismissive and unrelated to me being hurt,’ the woman said.

The alleged victim reported the incident in 2020.

“It happened right before the #MeToo movement that was important to me,” she explained.

Mr Evers, of Cleckheaton, West Yorkshire, denies sexual assault and claims someone else touched the woman’s buttocks.

The woman said she hadn't been drinking when Mr Evers approached her and asked her to 'come over here' for a picture, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

The woman said she hadn’t been drinking when Mr Evers approached her and asked her to ‘come over here’ for a picture, Westminster Magistrates Court heard.

The veteran told the court he drank just one glass of champagne at the event that night.

He said: “It was a big deal for me. We were a very young charity. I wanted to be able to remember that.

He said he asked the woman for a photo for her social media and she agreed.

“I put my arm around his waist. I had my trophy in my hand,” he said.

“The images were blurry, it was dark. I deleted them. I said I wasn’t going to bother her anymore.

Her attorney asked, “She says you put your hand down and squeezed her buttocks.”

Mr Evers denied sexually assaulting the woman and replied: ‘That didn’t happen.’

He later added, “I didn’t know who did it…I thought one of my volunteers might have done it.”

Mr. Evers joined the Royal Engineers in 1992 and later joined the 33rd Engineer Regiment EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) Wimbish and served in Bosnia.

The father-of-two became a firefighter after leaving the military and started Sapper Support in 2014 after hearing about a friend’s death with PTSD.

The trial continues tomorrow.

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Irish Defense Force Veterans Charity appeals to Cork Town Hall https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/irish-defense-force-veterans-charity-appeals-to-cork-town-hall/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/irish-defense-force-veterans-charity-appeals-to-cork-town-hall/ MEMBERS of the Veterans National Staff Organization (ONE) were joined by Minister of Defense Simon Coveney and Chief of the Defense Forces Lt. Gen. Seán Clancy at the Hotel de city ​​yesterday to launch the charity’s annual Fuchsia Appeal. The fundraising campaign, which will continue throughout September and will involve several events across the country, […]]]>

MEMBERS of the Veterans National Staff Organization (ONE) were joined by Minister of Defense Simon Coveney and Chief of the Defense Forces Lt. Gen. Seán Clancy at the Hotel de city ​​yesterday to launch the charity’s annual Fuchsia Appeal.

The fundraising campaign, which will continue throughout September and will involve several events across the country, will see members and volunteers selling symbolic fuchsia emblems to raise much needed funds for Irish Defense Force veterans.

ONE provides housing and support to homeless veterans across Ireland, with the ultimate aim of helping former staff members access permanent accommodation.

The organization also has a professional counseling service to support the mental health of struggling veterans.

The Secretary General of the Ministry of Defence, Jacqui McCrum, was also present at the launch of the Fuchsia 2022 appeal in Cork yesterday.

“Veterans have volunteered to join the Defense Forces, no one has volunteered to be a homeless veteran,” ONE CEO Cormac Kirwan said, speaking ahead of the launch. Fuchsia call 2022.

“ONE needs your support to provide shelter and services to those struggling within our veteran community.”

ONE is currently developing another house in Cork City at the top of St Luke’s, to expand its homeless accommodation to 57 rooms nationwide.

In addition to providing accommodation, the organization has a network of 15 Veterans Support Centers and 38 branches, where veterans are assisted in their search for housing, mental health support, counseling by peers, addiction services and employment opportunities.

The charity has an annual operating budget of approximately €1.1 million for ongoing services, plus additional expenses based on ongoing capital projects.

The organization says that while it is grateful for the state funding it receives, there is “a significant gap that needs to be filled by the charity to support its vital services”.

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Llangollen company pledges to support charity for veterans https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/llangollen-company-pledges-to-support-charity-for-veterans/ Tue, 30 Aug 2022 09:17:01 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/llangollen-company-pledges-to-support-charity-for-veterans/ CHARITY PLEDGE: Launchpad’s Speke House’s David Jackson (left) with Jason Rickwood Submitted by Craig Downs An adventure and outdoor activity company in North Wales has pledged its support to a charity for veterans. Bearded Men Adventures, based in LlangollenDenbighshire has agreed to donate 1% of its annual income from its activities to the charity Launchpad. […]]]>

CHARITY PLEDGE: Launchpad’s Speke House’s David Jackson (left) with Jason Rickwood

Submitted by Craig Downs

An adventure and outdoor activity company in North Wales has pledged its support to a charity for veterans.

Bearded Men Adventures, based in LlangollenDenbighshire has agreed to donate 1% of its annual income from its activities to the charity Launchpad.

The activity company offers accommodation, catering, adventure and activities such as rafting, coasteering, river tubing, mountaineering and paddleboarding.

Bearded Men Adventures, formed in 2018 by Jason Rickwood and Hugh Luckock, who have bushy beards, is for everyone, including whole hen and bachelor party weekends.

Passionate about giving back to good causes, Jason and Hugh chose Launchpad as their charity and said they admire the work Launchpad does for veterans.

Launchpad provides vital accommodation and support for up to 100 veterans in three homes in the north of England and helps residents transition from military to civilian life.

The company invited staff and residents of Launchpad’s Speke House in Liverpool to experience a day of outdoor adventure activities including white water rafting.

THE GREAT OUTDOORS: Launchpad’s Speke House staff and residents enjoy a day out

Jason, 36, a veteran himself, served 12 months with the Royal Engineers and most of his family have an army connection, including his two brothers and father. As well as Bearded Men Adventures he is also a Level 4 Snowboard Instructor and teaches the Royal Navy Snowboard Team during the winter months.

Hugh, 34, said: “We’ve been going there for four years now and despite the impact of Covid-19 on our business, we’re really starting to see the business take off.

“Supporting veterans is a great thing to do and when we found out what Launchpad is doing to support veterans who might be struggling with the transition, we wanted to support them and be part of a charity that does positive things.”

Jan Buckley, Acting Activities Coordinator at Launchpad’s Speke House, who also attended the whitewater rafting day with seven residents, said: “We are so grateful to Jason and Hugh for stepping up to support Launchpad. We had a great day and all the residents It gave everyone a boost and it was good to see the residents bonding.

“Being outdoors and staying active provides a positive and empowering experience for our residents and is a good way for them to manage their mental health and well-being. All the participants talked about it and commented on how much fun they had. »

The company and Launchpad are exploring the possibility of a September camping trip for residents. This will be a two-day adventure activity program and will include wild camping and bushcraft skills.

Launchpad’s Speke House includes 50 self-contained apartments and common areas such as a living room, kitchen/dining room, computer suite and garden. Staff work with multiple partners to support each resident on their journey to independent living.


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