Veterans community – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 04:03:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T112559.751-150x150.jpg Veterans community – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ 32 32 Flyover to mark Pottstown Community Veterans Day https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/flyover-to-mark-pottstown-community-veterans-day/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 17:10:05 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/flyover-to-mark-pottstown-community-veterans-day/ POTTSTOWN – The 7th Annual Pottstown Veterans Community Day will take place on Saturday, September 24. The festivities begin at 11 a.m. on Memorial Park Island, and are free and open to the public. Edward Conbeer The centerpiece of the event, as always, is the presentation of the Glass Tear Hero Award, designed to honor […]]]>

POTTSTOWN – The 7th Annual Pottstown Veterans Community Day will take place on Saturday, September 24. The festivities begin at 11 a.m. on Memorial Park Island, and are free and open to the public.

Edward Conbeer

The centerpiece of the event, as always, is the presentation of the Glass Tear Hero Award, designed to honor veterans who have returned home to become pillars of the local community. This year’s winners are Calvin Brooks (USMC), Edward Conbeer (US Navy) and Charles “Doc” Dougherty (US Navy). sergeant. Clyde Hoch (USMC, Ret.) will be the guest speaker.

This year’s ceremony also marks a milestone for the Island of Veterans project. On August 8, Pottstown Borough Council approved a resolution to officially rename Memorial Park Island to Veterans Island. Mayor Stephanie Henrick will be on hand to make the official statement.

To celebrate both this year’s Glass Tear Hero winners and commemorate this historic event as part of the Veterans Island Project’s mission to ensure this space remains dedicated to veterans for generations to come , we intend to hold a flyover during this year’s ceremony in hopes of providing this special moment for guests of this year’s ceremony.

Charles “Doc” Dougherty

The 7th Annual Pottstown Veterans’ Community Day is sponsored by Gablesville Athletic Club, Elks Veterans’ Committee Lodge 814, Vlahos-Dunn Insurance, Birdsboro American Legion 626; Stichter Lodge #254 F.&AM; Friends of Joe Ciresi, Nina’s cleaners and tailors; Tompkins Community Bank; Friends of Tracy Pennycuick; Ramona Beltz in memory of Lawrence Beltz US Navy, 2017 Glass Tear Honoree; Nancy and Dave Garner, 2021 Glass Tear winners; Pottstown goes fourth! Inc.; Wolf, Baldwin & Associates; Pottstown Quoit Club.

Also, JAB Insurance Brokers, Inc in honor of John A Bigham Jr.; Joseph D. Browne in memory of fallen Korean War veterans; Marvin W. Thrasher, Jr in honor of Marvin W. Thrasher, Jr US Navy; LTC (Ret’d) Roger M. Baumann in memory of Harold C. Bauman Army Air Corps; Frank Strunk in memory of Francis Strunk WWII USAF; David F Bohn in memory of James P Cawley; Christopher Steadman, David and Sandra Rogers; John and Jennifer Gunson; Marie & Francesco Franco; Nick and Renee Vance; Alessandria and James Dorgan; Jennifer and Matthew Mitchell.

All proceeds will go to the Veterans Island Project, a 501c3 non-profit organization dedicated to maintaining Veterans Island.

]]>
Legion branches work together for the benefit of veterans, the community https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/legion-branches-work-together-for-the-benefit-of-veterans-the-community/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 13:50:11 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/legion-branches-work-together-for-the-benefit-of-veterans-the-community/ WELLINGTON COUNTY – Local branches of The Royal Canadian Legion join branches across the province in celebrating Legion Week September 18-24. With branches opening after two years of COVID-19 closures and restrictions, many are planning a more traditional Legion week with events for their members and the public. DEREK MOORE “This is an opportunity for […]]]>

WELLINGTON COUNTY – Local branches of The Royal Canadian Legion join branches across the province in celebrating Legion Week September 18-24.

With branches opening after two years of COVID-19 closures and restrictions, many are planning a more traditional Legion week with events for their members and the public.

DEREK MOORE

“This is an opportunity for the Royal Canadian Legion to promote what we do and for local branches to more or less open the doors to the general public…and let people come in and see what we do,” said said Mount Forest resident Derek Moore, who earlier this year assumed the role of Ontario Command President for a three-year term.

“We want people to casually come in and see what it’s all about, talk to some people, and learn,” Moore said.

“There is so much to be proud of in the past year in Ontario,” Legion Dominion President Bruce Julian said in a message to Ontario Legion branches.

Maintaining a strong “Leave the Streets Behind” program to help veterans get off the streets, supporting veterans through the work of Legion Service Officers and other essential volunteers, strengthening local food banks, youth and elders groups and other community organizations are just a few examples of the initiatives that are taking place across the province, notes Julian.

“With a strong and growing membership of 100,000 and with the increased visibility of our work, the Ontario Branches are well positioned to become an even stronger network of support and camaraderie for our Veterans, their families and their friends,” he says.

“We have three tough years ahead of us as we begin to emerge from this COVID pandemic and things get back to pretty much normal,” Moore said in an online statement.

Moore said the provincial convention’s theme of “Working Together” is an appropriate theme for the challenges ahead.

Moore noted that Leave the Streets Behind, as well as the Legion’s service dogs, youth athletics, and poster, poem and essay programs are all “great” programs and initiatives run by the Royal Canadian Legion, and Ontario Command in particular.

“Every member of Ontario Command should be very, very proud to be part of such an incredible organization…” he said.

“Now more than ever, we need to encourage, attract and inspire others to come and join our team so that we can continue to provide these great programs for many years to come.”

Legion membership is open to those unconnected with the military. Moore notes that he is an associate member who became president of the Ontario Command.

However, Moore told the Advertiser the organization could also benefit from attracting more veterans.

“We’ve heard numbers, like 600,000 to 700,000 veterans across Canada, but only about 18% of them are actually Legion members…obviously that should be a lot more.

“We need new blood, we really need it,” he noted.

Moore said he thinks many view the Legion as a social club where alumni gather for a drink.

“It’s a place to socialize for sure,” he said.

However, he added: “It is a building, there is a room. You join, you can start any type of program, all kinds of different things,” he pointed out.

Legion Week in Ontario is celebrated during the third week of September each year, beginning on Sunday and ending on Saturday.

“Across our province and country, the Legion is a pillar of many communities,” said Ontario Premier Doug Ford in a Legion Week message.

“Citizens admire the Legionnaires for their tireless devotion to veterans and their families, and for their active support of the elderly, the young and those in need.

“I congratulate each legionnaire for their strong sense of civic duty, their spirit of volunteerism and their essential contributions to building a better province. »

]]>
Hines VA Hospital Suicide Prevention Art Fair Brings Veterans, Communities and Survivors Together | VA Hines Health Care https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/hines-va-hospital-suicide-prevention-art-fair-brings-veterans-communities-and-survivors-together-va-hines-health-care/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 19:21:19 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/hines-va-hospital-suicide-prevention-art-fair-brings-veterans-communities-and-survivors-together-va-hines-health-care/ The Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital held a Suicide Prevention Walk and Art Fair on Sept. 8 to raise awareness and prevent veteran suicide. Hundreds of veterans, employees and community members attended the day-long event in suburban Chicago, which featured artwork created by veterans exploring issues of self-harm, mental health and recovery. The event also […]]]>

The Edward Hines Jr. VA Hospital held a Suicide Prevention Walk and Art Fair on Sept. 8 to raise awareness and prevent veteran suicide.

Hundreds of veterans, employees and community members attended the day-long event in suburban Chicago, which featured artwork created by veterans exploring issues of self-harm, mental health and recovery. The event also shared resources for veterans and families seeking help.

“It turned out better than any of us hoped for,” said Ian Long, co-organizer of the event and Master of Social Work intern at Hines VA.

Long is a Navy veteran. For him, the fair was personal. Like many veterans, he attempted suicide and lost friends.

“I lost two friends in high school. I lost five sailors to suicide and attempted suicide three times,” he explained. “It’s a struggle, but that’s why suicide prevention is so important to me.”

According to Long, mental health and feelings of self-harm affect everyone differently, but help is always available.

“When you’re dealing with intense emotions like this, you don’t always know what to do. Sometimes you just need support from the community, from a health care provider, you just need someone. one to talk to and listen to, and there it is.”

In 2019, the suicide rate for veterans was 52% higher than for non-veteran adults in the United States, according to a 2021 Department of Veterans Affairs annual report on veteran suicide prevention.

Stressful life events such as divorce, job loss, substance abuse, or housing issues in some veterans can be risk factors for suicide, which past military experiences can aggravate. These challenges can be compounded by a stigma attached to sharing problems with others and seeking help, the 2021 report notes.

Although the report highlighted a 7.2% overall decline in veteran suicide rates between 2018 and 2019, Hines VA staff still believe any veteran suicides are too many and preventable.

“Suicide prevention is everyone’s business,” said Anita Carmona Caravelli, co-organizer of the event and senior suicide prevention coordinator at Hines VA. “You don’t have to be a suicide prevention coordinator or a physiatrist to make a difference. You just have to be a human being who is willing to offer help to someone in the need.”

Carmona Caravelli explained that the art fair is about veterans showing that it’s okay to express their emotions, good and bad, and that resources are available from the VA and other organizations.

Representatives from Hines VA services were on hand to share resources including mental health, intimate partner violence help, and substance abuse treatment, among others. Area nonprofits were also available, including Comfort Support Animal Organizations, Therapeutic Carpentry Services, and the Gary Sinise Foundation.

According to Carmona Caravelli, it was the first time her team could stage the event since 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We are so happy to be back,” she explained. “When we weren’t able to do it the first time, we received so many requests not only from veterans but also from staff. It broke my heart that I couldn’t do it until now.”

Navy veteran Gary Slomczynski was among the artists who took part in this year’s event, displaying three small Grim Reaper statues and two attacking trolls.

“It’s my emotions,” he explained.

Slomczynski is a survivor of military sexual trauma and attempted suicide who receives care through Hines VA. He uses art to help heal.

“Doing stuff like that puts me in a creative space instead of a destructive space,” Slomczynski said. “It gives me something to do that’s for me and keeps my mind in the right direction.”

Veterans looking for mental health support can call Hines VA Hospital Mental Health Services at 708-202-2803.

Veterans can also contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 988 and press 1, to speak to be contacted by responders trained in crisis intervention and military culture. VA also offers additional information as part of their campaign, “Don’t Wait, Reach,” at www.va.gov/REACH.

]]>
Art fair raises awareness of suicide prevention among veterans https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/art-fair-raises-awareness-of-suicide-prevention-among-veterans/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 14:35:49 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/art-fair-raises-awareness-of-suicide-prevention-among-veterans/ The Edward Hines Jr. Hospital, VA, held a Suicide Prevention Walk and Art Fair on Sept. 8 to raise awareness and prevent suicide among veterans. Hundreds of veterans, employees and community members attended the day-long event, which featured artwork by veterans, who expressed issues of self-harm, mental health and recovery. The event also shared resources […]]]>

The Edward Hines Jr. Hospital, VA, held a Suicide Prevention Walk and Art Fair on Sept. 8 to raise awareness and prevent suicide among veterans.

Hundreds of veterans, employees and community members attended the day-long event, which featured artwork by veterans, who expressed issues of self-harm, mental health and recovery. The event also shared resources for veterans and families seeking help.

“It turned out better than we expected,” said Ian Long, co-organizer of the event and Master of Social Work intern at Hines VA.

Long is a Navy veteran. For him, the fair was personal. Like many veterans, he attempted suicide and lost friends.

“I lost two friends in high school. I lost five sailors to suicide and attempted suicide three times,” he explained. “It’s a struggle, but that’s why suicide prevention is so important to me.”

According to Long, mental health and feelings of self-harm affect everyone differently, but help is always available.

“When you’re dealing with intense emotions like this, you don’t always know what to do. Sometimes you just need support from the community, from a health care provider, you just need someone. one to talk to and listen to, and there it is.”

In 2019, the suicide rate for veterans was 52% higher than for non-veteran adults in the United States, according to a 2021 Department of Veterans Affairs annual report on veteran suicide prevention.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

Stressful life events such as divorce, job loss, substance abuse, or housing issues in some veterans can be risk factors for suicide, which can be exacerbated by past military experiences. These challenges can be compounded by a stigma attached to sharing problems with others and seeking help, the 2021 report notes.

Although the report highlighted a 7.2% overall decline in veteran suicide rates between 2018 and 2019, Hines VA staff still believe any veteran suicides are too many and preventable.

“Suicide prevention is everyone’s business,” said Anita Carmona Caravelli, co-organizer of the event and senior suicide prevention coordinator at Hines VA. “You don’t have to be a suicide prevention coordinator or a physiatrist to make a difference. You just have to be a human being who is willing to offer help to someone in the need.”

Carmona Caravelli explained that the art fair is about veterans showing that it’s okay to express their emotions, good and bad, and that resources are available from the VA and other organizations.

Representatives from Hines VA services were on hand to share resources including mental health, intimate partner violence help, and substance abuse treatment, among others. Area nonprofits were also available, including Comfort Support Animal Organizations, Therapeutic Carpentry Services, and the Gary Sinise Foundation.

According to Carmona Caravelli, it was the first time her team could stage the event since 2019, due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We are so happy to be back,” she explained. “When we weren’t able to do it the first time, we received so many requests not only from veterans but also from staff. It broke my heart that I couldn’t do it until now. “

Navy veteran Gary Slomczynski was among the artists who took part in this year’s event, displaying three small Grim Reaper statues and two attacking trolls.

“It’s my emotions,” he explained.

Slomczynski is a survivor of military sexual trauma and attempted suicide who receives care through Hines VA. He uses art to help heal.

“Doing stuff like that puts me in a creative space instead of a destructive space,” Slomczynski said. “It gives me something to do that’s for me and keeps my mind in the right direction.”

Veterans looking for mental health support can call Hines VA Hospital Mental Health Services at (708) 202-2803.

Veterans can also contact the Veterans Crisis Line at 988 and press 1, to be connected with responders trained in crisis intervention and military culture.

The VA also offers additional information as part of their campaign, “Don’t wait, join”, at www.va.gov/REACH.

]]> Longmont Veterans Community Project Deploys Mobile Outreach Van https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/longmont-veterans-community-project-deploys-mobile-outreach-van/ Thu, 01 Sep 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/longmont-veterans-community-project-deploys-mobile-outreach-van/ The Longmont Veterans Community Project launched a brand new outreach mobile unit on Wednesday. The van will connect homeless veterans in rural northern Colorado to resources such as transportation and temporary housing. KUNC’s Beau Baker spoke with VCP Executive Director Jennifer Seybold about the mobile unit and efforts to help homeless veterans in our area. […]]]>

The Longmont Veterans Community Project launched a brand new outreach mobile unit on Wednesday. The van will connect homeless veterans in rural northern Colorado to resources such as transportation and temporary housing.

KUNC’s Beau Baker spoke with VCP Executive Director Jennifer Seybold about the mobile unit and efforts to help homeless veterans in our area.

This interview has been edited for clarity.

Beau Baker: Jennifer, The Veterans Community Project started in Kansas City as a village of nearly 50 small houses for homeless veterans. Can you tell me how the organization got to Longmont?

Jennifer Seybold: We’ve really been operating here since 2020. There was a group of people here at Longmont tasked with looking at veteran homelessness in our community. What are the ways we could solve this problem?

Kevin Mulshine – he’s a developer and owner of HMS Development – was tasked with sort of looking at other community models. So he went to Kansas City and said, “I want to take this to Longmont.

What’s really cool is that Kevin put his money where his mouth is. He donated the land for our project and worked very closely with the city. So he gave us a little over two acres to build our little houses here in Longmont. Our village is not yet finished and construction is in progress.

But ever since, we’ve been serving veterans in the community through our outreach center on Main Street. And we have already been able to help more than 300 veterans in our community and permanently at Maison 40 even though we don’t have a village yet. So the work of our case managers is already having quite a significant impact in our community.

Beautiful : Longmont’s mini-houses are currently under construction. But this week, you launched this mobile outreach program that includes a fully accessible van at the ADA. What will this do for homeless veterans?

Jennifer: Yes, it’s a really exciting project. Many services are truly centralized in large urban spaces. And so when you’re in that area, there’s a lot more access. But many of our veterans don’t live in those communities. They live in much more rural areas. Often they don’t have transportation to even get to doctor’s appointments or things like that. And so it is extremely important to come where there is a need because a lot of people cannot come to where we are.

Beautiful : The van will launch in mountain and lowland communities like Gilpin, Boulder, Clear Creek and Weld counties. What will the mobile unit offer?

Jennifer: We see veterans from all over northern Colorado and because we are so spread out it can sometimes be difficult for people to get to where we are. This allows us to go to them. We can onboard someone for assistance at the time.

We can register them to have contact with a case manager. Or one of the things our case managers do best is simply connect people to services close to them. So make sure we do a very smooth transfer of that. Get an idea of ​​what this person needs. We also carry supplies such as food and winter supplies. Basic things that will change seasonally as needed. But it gives us a chance to reach people who, first, may not know we exist and, second, may be too far away to come to the outreach center.

Beautiful : It really does seem to do a bit of everything. So this mobile unit is being paid for by a two-year grant that came out of last year’s state legislative session. It took some work to get started, including establishing a partnership between the Veterans Community Project and the Colorado Department of Local Affairs. In your experience, is it difficult to get funding for services for veterans in need?

Jennifer: It’s an interesting question, and I should probably say that we’re also a bit unique in how we define “veteran”. We don’t consider how long a person has been in service or what type of service, and we don’t care about their discharge status. It’s a bit different from some other organizations. This is certainly different from the eligibility requirements for VA services. So that makes our fundraising a bit more difficult simply because we don’t necessarily accept federal funding if there are conditions attached to it.

We’re getting more support from the state, and I’m really happy to see that the states are kind of downplaying the restrictions. But we want to make sure that any funding we take in doesn’t prevent us from serving any veteran who walks through the door, regardless of their release status. I think a lot of people don’t necessarily know that a lot of our veterans don’t get support services from VA and other government agencies.

I think there is a bit of a misconception about who qualifies for these services. It is estimated that more than 500,000 veterans are living on a non-honourable discharge status, meaning they would not qualify for these kinds of services, making programs like ours essential. And we really count on the public support for that.

Beautiful : It was Jennifer Seybold, executive director of the Longmont Veterans Community Project.

To learn more about the Vererans Community Project and its mobile unit – visit https://www.veteranscommunityproject.org/vcp-colorado

This story was produced by Maxine Speier of KUNC

]]>
Veterans and community members honor heroes lost in Kabul a year ago https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-and-community-members-honor-heroes-lost-in-kabul-a-year-ago/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 02:28:15 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-and-community-members-honor-heroes-lost-in-kabul-a-year-ago/ YORKTOWN, Ind. – At American Legion Post No. 321, August 25 will now and forever be a memorable day. Exactly one year ago, our nation lost 13 American military personnel in a suicide bombing at Kabul airport in Afghanistan. One soldier, one sailor and 11 marines made the ultimate sacrifice, including a local Logansport hero, […]]]>

YORKTOWN, Ind. – At American Legion Post No. 321, August 25 will now and forever be a memorable day.

Exactly one year ago, our nation lost 13 American military personnel in a suicide bombing at Kabul airport in Afghanistan. One soldier, one sailor and 11 marines made the ultimate sacrifice, including a local Logansport hero, Corporal Humberto Sanchez.

“I met him in June 2021, then when he traveled to Afghanistan in Kabul, that was the last time I saw him,” the master sergeant said. Stephen Miller, member of the US Marine Corp. who spent time with some of the men and women who lost their lives.

Staff Sgt. Miller works for the US Marine Corp. for 13 years now and is a member of the American Legion Post #321. On Friday, he helped organize and bring community members together to honor those 13 lives lost.

“Cpl. Lopez, Cap. Page, and heading. Sanchez – I played football with them almost every night for about two months,” said Staff Sgt. Miller. “I didn’t know the name of their best friend or the name of their pet, but when you’re overseas and you only have a couple hundred marines and a few sailors, that kind of stuff is what allows you to continue.”

Staff Sgt. Miller shared stories and read each of the names of the 13 U.S. service members cleared to the crowd.

“I just want to make sure their names and their memories aren’t forgotten,” the staff sergeant said. said Miller.

“My child is recognized locally — that’s something important to me,” said Cpl. Sanchez’s mother, Coral Briseno.

Briseno said she constantly receives messages from people who feel compelled to share stories about her son. She said everyone reminded her how proud her son makes her.

“Even people I don’t even know message me and say, ‘Hey, you don’t know me, and I don’t know you, but I wanted you to know your son was special,'” Briseno said. . “He inspires me all the time.”

Staff Sgt. Miller said he plans to make Friday’s memorial service an annual service.

“All the marines that died that day – and the soldier and the sailor – they would like everyone to remember. The wounded too, ”said the master sergeant. Miller.

]]>
Upcoming weekend events honor local heroes in the veterans community – Cache Valley Daily https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/upcoming-weekend-events-honor-local-heroes-in-the-veterans-community-cache-valley-daily/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 22:30:15 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/upcoming-weekend-events-honor-local-heroes-in-the-veterans-community-cache-valley-daily/ Freedom Fest activities taking place at Elk Ridge Park in North Logan include a display of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Traveling Wall. This exhibit is an 80% recreation of the Vietnam War veterans in Washington. DC, plus 21 military campaign memorial tributes. NORTH LOGAN – Upcoming weekend events will honor local heroes from the Cache […]]]>
title=

Freedom Fest activities taking place at Elk Ridge Park in North Logan include a display of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Traveling Wall. This exhibit is an 80% recreation of the Vietnam War veterans in Washington. DC, plus 21 military campaign memorial tributes.

NORTH LOGAN – Upcoming weekend events will honor local heroes from the Cache Valley veteran community.

It’s all part of Freedom Fest, a week-long celebration of all things happening militarily at Elk Ridge Park here.

The free benefit concert for the Dan Gyllenskog Veterans Resource Center will take place on Friday, August 26 starting at 6 p.m. The concert will conclude with a fireworks display by ProPyro ACME, sponsored by Sunset Mortuary and local businesses.

The benefit concert will include food trucks and displays from local veterans who have been able to find purpose in their lives through art, leatherwork and more, according to Phil Redlinger, executive director of the Gyllenskog Center.

The late Dan Gyllenskog was from Smithfield and enlisted in the US Marine Corps in 1966.

While serving in Vietnam with the 1st Marine Division from 1968 to 1969, he was wounded and decorated.

Gyllenskog was an active member of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Marine Corps League, Military Order of the Purple Heart, and Vietnam Veterans of America.

He also provided informal counseling to some of the more than 5,000 veterans living in Cache Valley about their military benefits and service-related disabilities.

On Saturday, August 27, local veterans will host the annual Michael J. Allred Ride for the Fallen.

This 120 mile motorcycle tour to Bear Lake will depart from Elk Ridge Park, kickstands at 10:30am.

The annual Northern Utah and Southern Idaho Motorcycle Tour is sponsored by the Lance Corporal Michael J. Allred Scholarship Foundation of Hyde Park. This charity was founded by Brett and Zellene Allred to honor their son, LCpl. Michael J. Allred, a US Marine killed in action in Iraq on September 6, 2004.

Michael Jacob Allred graduated from Sky View High School and enlisted in the US Marine Corps in January 2001.

After basic and individual training, he was assigned to the Compagnie des Indes, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division at Camp Pendleton, California. In recognition of his work ethic and leadership abilities, Michael Allred was the first member of his cohort of recruits to achieve the rank of Lance Corporal and appointed as an infantry firefighter team leader.

LCpl. His first Allred combat tour was during Operation Iraqi Freedom (the invasion of Iraq) from January to May 2003. After being reassigned to Fox Company, 2n/a Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, he redeployed to Iraq for combat duties in the hotly contested region of Fallujah in March 2004.

Michael Allred received a Purple Heart medal after being wounded in action in late March 2004.

Six months later, he was among seven Marines and three Iraqi National Guardsmen killed in a suicide car bombing outside Fallujah.

The August 27 Ride in Honor of Michael Allred is one of the most popular charity motorcycle tours held in this area each summer.

In addition to supporting its patriotic theme and worthy goals, regional bikers are excited about this event because it is exceptionally well organized and rides through some of the most scenic landscapes in northern Utah and southern Idaho.

Freedom Fest activities will conclude on Sunday, August 28 with a non-denominational field service honoring all of Cache Valley’s fallen veterans.

The Dan Gyllenskog Veterans Resource Center is located at 1760 North, 200 East (Suite 100), North Logan.





]]>
A community center for Republican veterans and more titles in Virginia https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/a-community-center-for-republican-veterans-and-more-titles-in-virginia/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/a-community-center-for-republican-veterans-and-more-titles-in-virginia/ • The Republican National Committee has opened a new Veterans Community Center in Virginia Beach to provide training for veterans who wish to campaign on behalf of Republican candidates.—Virginia Pilot • “A Virginia Beach company that was to make Walmart deliveries to millions of homes by drone announced Wednesday that it is expanding its headquarters […]]]>

• The Republican National Committee has opened a new Veterans Community Center in Virginia Beach to provide training for veterans who wish to campaign on behalf of Republican candidates.—Virginia Pilot

• “A Virginia Beach company that was to make Walmart deliveries to millions of homes by drone announced Wednesday that it is expanding its headquarters and establishing a testing, training, research and development center at a public junior college. .”—Washington Post

• A senior adviser hired by Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s administration was asked to resign as deputy director of a Virginia agency in 1997 “after a legislative audit found he couldn’t justify a payout nearly $8,000 to a former employee”.VPM

• The Virginia NAACP is leading a campaign to change the method of selecting school boards in some localities, moving from nominations to elections. The organization begins with Hanover County, which has been rocked by recent disputes over transgender students and race relations.—Richmond Times-Dispatch

• Federally recognized Virginia Tribes work with the state Department of Education and school divisions to correct what is taught in schools about tribes. “The story in there that they have and the students are getting now isn’t really the truth, it’s not really the facts.” –WVTF

• Nearly half of Virginia residents live in a “child care desert,” an area with insufficient child care options.—Cardinal News

• “State regulators said Wednesday they would consider additional arguments about whether Dominion Energy Virginia’s plans to build a massive offshore wind farm should include ratepayer protections that the utility says will kill the project. .”—Associated press

• Virginia’s coastal forests are threatened by rising sea levels.—WHORO

• The Virginia Beach Schools superintendent clashed at a school board meeting with conservative board members who called administrators and teachers “porn peddlers” for their refusal to remove certain books from libraries. “You will stop saying that my staff give pornography to children.” –Virginia Pilot

• Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have adopted one of the rescued beagles from the Envigo breeding facility in Cumberland.—New York Times

Get morning headlines delivered to your inbox

]]>
Veterans Community Living Center at Fitzsimons ranked #1 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-community-living-center-at-fitzsimons-ranked-1/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 21:08:52 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-community-living-center-at-fitzsimons-ranked-1/ Denver, CO, Aug. 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center was ranked Colorado’s No. 1 retirement home by Newsweek and in the top 25 out of nearly 12,000 in 25 states. Newsweek has partnered with global data research firm Statista to create an annual ranking of America’s Best Nursing Homes for […]]]>

Denver, CO, Aug. 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center was ranked Colorado’s No. 1 retirement home by Newsweek and in the top 25 out of nearly 12,000 in 25 states. Newsweek has partnered with global data research firm Statista to create an annual ranking of America’s Best Nursing Homes for 2022 and identified the top 450.

Per Newsweek, this year’s rankings identified the nation’s best nursing homes based on three critical criteria: aggregate performance data, peer recommendations and each facility’s handling of COVID-19, compared to competition in the state.

We are honored and delighted to have our Fitzsimons team recognized with this ranking.“, said Michelle Barnes, executive director of the Colorado Department of Human Services, which operates the veterans’ nursing home. The staff have worked so hard before and during COVID, and we are proud of the dedication, passion, and diligence of the incredible staff caring for our nation’s heroes across the state.

“The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center has provided care for veterans and their family members for 20 years,” said Elizabeth Mullins, director of the Veterans Community Living Centers Division. “Veterans and residents of Fitzsimons are so proud of their home, and this public recognition absolutely confirms why: it’s a great place to live, work and thrive.”

The Veterans Community Life Center at Fitzsimons serves veterans, spouses/widows of veterans, and Gold Star relatives. Fitzsimons is licensed to serve 180 residents and provides skilled nursing care to long-term care residents, short-term rehabilitation, and has a secure memory care ward for residents with dementia.

More information on Colorado’s #1 Retirement Home can be found here.

###

        
]]>
Veterans Community Living Center at Fitzsimons ranked #1 by Newsweek https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-community-living-center-at-fitzsimons-ranked-1-by-newsweek/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 21:08:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-community-living-center-at-fitzsimons-ranked-1-by-newsweek/ Denver, CO, Aug. 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center has been ranked #1 nursing home in Colorado by Newsweek and in the top 25 out of nearly 12,000 in 25 states. Newsweek has partnered with global data research firm Statista to create an annual ranking of America’s Best Nursing Homes […]]]>

Denver, CO, Aug. 15, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center has been ranked #1 nursing home in Colorado by Newsweek and in the top 25 out of nearly 12,000 in 25 states. Newsweek has partnered with global data research firm Statista to create an annual ranking of America’s Best Nursing Homes for 2022 and identified the top 450.

According to Newsweek, this year’s rankings identified the nation’s best nursing homes based on three key criteria: overall performance data, peer recommendations and individual facility performance. management of COVID-19compared to the competition in the state.

We are honored and delighted to have our Fitzsimons team recognized with this ranking.“, said Michelle Barnes, executive director of the Colorado Department of Human Services, which operates the veterans’ nursing home. The staff have worked so hard before and during COVID, and we are proud of the dedication, passion, and diligence of the incredible staff caring for our nation’s heroes across the state.

“The Fitzsimons Veterans Community Living Center has provided care for veterans and their family members for 20 years,” said Elizabeth Mullins, director of the Veterans Community Living Centers Division. “Veterans and residents of Fitzsimons are so proud of their home, and this public recognition absolutely confirms why: it’s a great place to live, work and thrive.”

The Veterans Community Life Center at Fitzsimons serves veterans, spouses/widows of veterans, and Gold Star relatives. Fitzsimons is licensed to serve 180 residents and provides skilled nursing care to long-term care residents, short-term rehabilitation, and has a secure memory care ward for residents with dementia.

More information on Colorado’s #1 Retirement Home can be found here.

###

CONTACT: Alex Urbach Colorado Department of Human Services 7203913557 alex.urbach@state.co.us
]]>