mental health – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 08:04:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T112559.751-150x150.jpg mental health – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ 32 32 The Poplar Club of Accrington will hold a fundraiser for veterans https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/the-poplar-club-of-accrington-will-hold-a-fundraiser-for-veterans/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 16:11:26 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/the-poplar-club-of-accrington-will-hold-a-fundraiser-for-veterans/ Written by community journalist, Liam Milton A Hyndburn charity is to hold a fundraising event at the Poplar Club in Accrington to help veterans of the armed forces. The funds raised will be used to finance a “mess club” which aims to promote socialization within a group of veterans. Faith Marriott MBE, Business Development Manager, […]]]>

Written by community journalist, Liam Milton

A Hyndburn charity is to hold a fundraising event at the Poplar Club in Accrington to help veterans of the armed forces.

The funds raised will be used to finance a “mess club” which aims to promote socialization within a group of veterans.

Faith Marriott MBE, Business Development Manager, said: ‘This group is trying to encourage each other to get out from behind the woodwork, get out of the house, reduce isolation, reduce mental health [issues]and just come up with ideas of what they want to do.

“A lot of services are about what they offer, we want this group of people to develop what they want out of it.”

Homes For Humanity, based in Eastgate, Accrington, aims to provide people at risk across Hyndburn with sustainable housing and employment.

Ms Marriott said: ‘The charity is about veterans, allowing them to come and talk to us about their mental health issues, [or] if they are looking for work.

“Lately we’ve had a few struggling to find accommodation, unsecured accommodation, issues with landlords, etc.”

Ms Marriott added: ‘We also aim to work with low-income families and anyone who is looking for work or needs a foothold or step on the ladder so to speak.

The event starts at 7.30pm with tickets priced at £10 including sausage sandwiches.

For more details visit their website here.


Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more from dedicated Accrington, Lancashire InYourArea Feed.


]]>
Mace’s bipartisan bill improves federal homeless veterans program https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/maces-bipartisan-bill-improves-federal-homeless-veterans-program/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 22:44:17 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/maces-bipartisan-bill-improves-federal-homeless-veterans-program/ U.S. Representative Nancy Mace (R-SC) introduced a bipartisan bill Feb. 9 to improve how local case management services are provided to homeless veterans through a collaborative federal program. Rep. Mace co-sponsored the HUD VASH Case Manager Act, HR 6677, alongside the bill’s sponsor, U.S. Rep. Sara Jacobs (D-CA), which would amend federal law to change […]]]>

U.S. Representative Nancy Mace (R-SC) introduced a bipartisan bill Feb. 9 to improve how local case management services are provided to homeless veterans through a collaborative federal program.

Rep. Mace co-sponsored the HUD VASH Case Manager Act, HR 6677, alongside the bill’s sponsor, U.S. Rep. Sara Jacobs (D-CA), which would amend federal law to change eligibility requirements for collaborating entities with the VA Secretary to provide case management services. to homeless veterans through the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development-United States Department of Veterans Affairs Supportive Housing Program (HUD-VASH).

“This bill allows the VA the flexibility to hire local case managers,” Rep. Mace said. “We are always looking for ways to improve services for veterans, and this bill will help the VA attract more qualified and experienced social workers, thereby optimizing our programs for those who have served our country.”

The HUD-VASH program website states that the program combines rental assistance from HUD’s Housing Choice Voucher with VA case management and support services for homeless veterans. These services help veterans and their families find and maintain permanent housing and access health care, mental health treatment, addictions counseling and other supports to help them through their recovery process and maintain their housing.

Although successful, annual reports show that the HUD-VASH program faces challenges in recruiting and retaining case managers, who are integral to running the program with maximum effectiveness, according to information provided by HUD-VASH staff. representing Mace.

HR 6677 has been referred to both the US House Veterans Affairs Committee and the US House Financial Services Committee for review.

This entry was posted by Ripon Advance News Service. Add the permalink to your favorites.

]]>
Clinton Township District Court Veterans Program receives $558,000 grant – Macomb Daily https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/clinton-township-district-court-veterans-program-receives-558000-grant-macomb-daily/ Sat, 05 Feb 2022 20:27:23 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/clinton-township-district-court-veterans-program-receives-558000-grant-macomb-daily/ The District Court 41B Veterans Treatment Court received $558,000 that will not only support it, but allow it to expand over the next four years. Court officials said they recently learned that the court was a recipient of a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance Adult Drug and Veterans Treatment Court’s discretionary grant program […]]]>

The District Court 41B Veterans Treatment Court received $558,000 that will not only support it, but allow it to expand over the next four years.

Court officials said they recently learned that the court was a recipient of a grant from the Bureau of Justice Assistance Adult Drug and Veterans Treatment Court’s discretionary grant program to operate the VTC. This is the second time the court has been awarded the grant since the VTC was established in 2012.

Kara Hartman, Specialty Courts Coordinator at District Court 41B. PHOTO SUBMITTED

“This grant will have a positive effect on our participants and our VTC program, as it allows us to increase the capacity of the program to 30 veterans, add additional hours of counselling, testing and recovery coaching by peers,” said Kara Hartman, specialist court coordinator at 41B.

The VTC also receives state funding through the State Court Administrative Office.

]]>
Veterans’ charity leader receives New Year’s honor after three decades of service https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-charity-leader-receives-new-years-honor-after-three-decades-of-service/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veterans-charity-leader-receives-new-years-honor-after-three-decades-of-service/ The work of a Stirling stalwart in supporting veterans across the Forth Valley has been recognized with a British Empire Medal. Mary Kenyon, who is president of the regional division of the charity SSAFA, received the award in the New Year’s Honors List after three decades of service to military families, veterans and serving personnel […]]]>

The work of a Stirling stalwart in supporting veterans across the Forth Valley has been recognized with a British Empire Medal.

Mary Kenyon, who is president of the regional division of the charity SSAFA, received the award in the New Year’s Honors List after three decades of service to military families, veterans and serving personnel for the charity.

The citation that accompanies the award salutes Mary’s “outstanding dedication and commitment” to the cause as a volunteer for over 28 years and hails her as an “outstanding leader and motivator” who acts as a mentor to bring out the best of people to achieve their goal. potential.

After learning of the honour, Mary said: ‘I am quite overwhelmed, almost embarrassed really, that the honor in this branch and for the work done in the east of Scotland has been bestowed on me.

“It really is an award for the whole team, and I’m absolutely delighted for them because they’ve worked so hard through so many changes over the past two years.

“It has been such a pleasure to work with all of them and I am extremely proud to be their representative in the New Year’s Honors List, and very touched that people have taken the time to prepare the application and offer me d be the recipient.

“The BEM is a fantastic reward for all of us locally, and says what SSAFA is all about.”

SSAFA operates across the UK, with 19 branches across Scotland – including Forth Valley – and provides a range of support and services to former service members.

The charity’s volunteers take on tasks such as social work, fundraising and community aid, with the Forth Valley division taking on around 500 referrals each year, of which almost 150 become cases in need of more help. targeted.

They range from simpler cases such as help with funeral costs to more complex issues involving physical or mental health issues that may require several months of support from start to finish.

Work is also carried out in conjunction with groups such as the Armed Services Advisory Project, regimental associations such as the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Association, the British Legion and the Wee County Vets, and other military charities.

SSAFA National Chairman Sir Gary Coward added: “Mary has always had a genuine interest in people and a strong desire to help others in need.

“She can be very persuasive when needed and does not give up easily, achieving amazing results in securing help from various organizations on behalf of SSAFA beneficiaries in need.

“Over the years with SSAFA, Mary has helped thousands of people and made a real difference in their lives and those of their families.

“Calling her a credit to SSAFA simply does not do justice to her contribution to the charity, or to the countless number of people she has helped over nearly three decades of volunteering with SSAFA.

“She embodies the positive attitude of all our volunteers, stepping in when needed and inspiring us all. »

]]>
Hook Army officer to raise money for veterans charity https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/hook-army-officer-to-raise-money-for-veterans-charity/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/hook-army-officer-to-raise-money-for-veterans-charity/ An ARMY officer who grew up in Hook prepares to take on 12 Herculean challenges in 12 months of 2022 to raise money for a veterans’ charity. Jennifer Price, 31, who now lives between Hampshire and London due to her work in the army, is raising money for the Veterans Foundation. They include climbing Aconcagua, […]]]>

An ARMY officer who grew up in Hook prepares to take on 12 Herculean challenges in 12 months of 2022 to raise money for a veterans’ charity.

Jennifer Price, 31, who now lives between Hampshire and London due to her work in the army, is raising money for the Veterans Foundation.

They include climbing Aconcagua, the highest mountain in the Americas, and Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, and competing in skiing, canoeing, marathons and an ultra-marathon (250 km) around the world .

The first challenge takes place on January 16 when she participates in the Pustertaler Ski Marathon in Italy.

Jenny, who spent the first 25 years of her life in Hook, is an officer in the British Army.

She will leave the army next summer and has therefore decided to contribute to a great cause by leaving.

“I think it’s going to be harder than I think right now,” Jenny said.

“I’ve tried skiing, canoeing, running and mountaineering, but I’ve never taken on those specific challenges before. I have never run a marathon before. But I’ve been in the military for 10 years, so I’ve done a lot of physical activity.

“I wonder if I underestimate [the challenges] a little, but I’m really excited. But more importantly, the purpose is to raise funds for the Veterans Foundation.

Jennifer Price

Jenny also explained why she takes on these challenges.

She wrote on her blog, “Do I want to do this because I’m really into adventure and challenge and want to inspire others?

“Do I want to do this to raise money for a good cause?

“Or do I want to do this because I want to change and develop my identity by doing something with a wow factor? Is it my ego or my sense of doing something meaningful that is the driving force? A dichotomy between selfish and authentic.

Basingstoke Gazette: Jennifer PriceJennifer Price

“I’m afraid of being seen as a signal of virtue or not being authentic in my approach to this. I know how many cynics consider some fundraisers to be just the adventures of the middle class, dignified by joining a charity.

“I don’t want that to be the perception people have of this event, but I also have to be honest with myself about my reasons. By questioning this and talking with friends, I realized that these are all the reasons I mentioned above, and they are equal to each other.

“I want to do something meaningful at a time in my life when I have plenty of time and freedom to do it. It would be so easy for me to pick some of these challenges and complete them at my own pace, at my own pace and without the need for sponsors or fundraising effort. But it wouldn’t be worth it; what would I give back or achieve? »

Basingstoke Gazette: Jennifer PriceJennifer Price

Jenny has the full support of the Veterans Foundation, which raises money for several military charities ranging from mental health to family support services and injury charities.

Some of Jenny’s challenges will be part of an organized event and others will be auto-generated.

Details of the challenges and funds raised will be regularly updated via his blog.

Jenny, who went to school in Odiham, is a former member of the Basingstoke Ladies hockey team and an avid Basingstoke Town FC fan.

If you would like to contribute to Jenny’s challenges and help the Veterans Foundation, visit her blog at www.jennevolve.co.uk.

]]>
Kansas City Veterans Community Project Announces Expansion https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-announces-expansion/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-announces-expansion/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022. The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022.

The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help make the announcement on Twitter and YouTube.

The Veterans Community Project works to fill the gaps veterans often face after being discharged from the military.

Since its inception in 2015, the nonprofit has built a community of dozens of tiny homes at East 89th Street and Troost Avenue in Kansas City. Homeless veterans can live in the houses while they work to get back on their feet. They also have access to the group’s drop-in center and a bus stop. the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority provides free transportation for veterans.

The project is also in the midst of a fundraising campaign to build what it calls a new “shipping campus”. When the building is complete, the organization will be able to provide financial management, job search, access to mental health care and other needs for veterans.

Those needs came in the form of preparing for a harsh winter Thursday morning. A mobile “stand down” unit has been deployed inside the Veterans Awareness Center. Volunteers and community partners distributed winter coats, boots and other clothing that men and women will need over the next few weeks.

Employment Services, Legal Assistance, and even the VA Medical Center were also on hand at the event to provide free flu shots, COVID-19 reminders, and help finding jobs.

“We are extremely proud of what we have done here in Kansas City. It’s the flagship and it’s where it all began, it’s the heart and soul of the Veterans Community Project. The possibility of broadcasting this project across the country is a joy. Seeing each city take ownership of the project is what makes us successful,” said Vincent Morales, co-founder of the Veterans Community Project.

If you are a veteran in need of assistance or would like to learn more about the group, the Veterans Community Project website has additional information.

]]>
Warren, Washington Counties seek organization to expand veterans program https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/warren-washington-counties-seek-organization-to-expand-veterans-program/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/warren-washington-counties-seek-organization-to-expand-veterans-program/ (NEWS10) – It’s easy to say thank you to a veteran on Veterans Day, but when the day is over, some vets need more than just a “thank you for your service.” They may need services to help them readjust to civilian life. To help make this adjustment easier, Washington and Warren counties are among […]]]>

(NEWS10) – It’s easy to say thank you to a veteran on Veterans Day, but when the day is over, some vets need more than just a “thank you for your service.” They may need services to help them readjust to civilian life.

To help make this adjustment easier, Washington and Warren counties are among two dozen counties in New York State that offer the Joseph P. Dwyer Peer to Peer program for veterans. “We’ve had this joint program for a number of years and it’s been quite successful. In fact, to the point where we think if we can get a nonprofit involved to help our staff run it, we can provide more service,” says Warren County Public Affairs Director Don Lehman.

Counties for the Adirondack Peer-to-Peer Support Services, Joseph P. Dwyer Project, provides counseling, mental health resources, and education, outreach, and employment assistance to veterans. Both counties are looking to expand the program by partnering with a nonprofit so they can not only help more veterans, but also get advice while doing so.

In a press release, Kenneth Winchell, Director of Veterans Services for Washington County, said, “My office looks forward to assisting the nonprofit organization in developing and expanding this program to meet the needs of our veterans by creating a strong peer support system. within this community.

The Peer-to-Peer Veterans Program is open to all veterans transitioning from military to civilian life. It was launched in 2012 in Suffolk County and quickly grew to be implemented in nearly half of the counties in New York State.

The Warren and Washington County Veterans Services offices would work with an organization willing to use New York State funding to further expand the two-county program. Both counties are among 25 counties in New York State that have established peer-to-peer support for services provided by veterans for veterans.

“I believe having a nonprofit community that continues to grow this program will better benefit our veterans in Warren and Washington counties on a broader spectrum than ever before,” said Denise DiResta, director Warren County Veterans Services.

Counties have issued a “Request for Proposals” (RFP), for eligible organizations registered as 501(c)(3), and have experience providing veterans services or mental health services to adults to include veterans. Proposals will be accepted until December 2.

Organizations wishing to request a copy of the RFP or have questions may contact the Warren County Purchasing Department at (518) 761-6538.

]]>
Veteran Community Project Expands to St. Louis, Oklahoma City While Remaining Committed to KC https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veteran-community-project-expands-to-st-louis-oklahoma-city-while-remaining-committed-to-kc/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veteran-community-project-expands-to-st-louis-oklahoma-city-while-remaining-committed-to-kc/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022. The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022.

The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help make the announcement on Twitter and YouTube.

The Veterans Community Project works to fill the gaps veterans often face after being discharged from the military.

Since its creation in 2015, the association has built a community of dozens of small houses at East 89th Street and Troost Avenue in Kansas City. Homeless veterans can live in the houses while they work to get back on their feet. They also have access to the group’s walk-in center and a bus stop. the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority provides free transportation for veterans.

The project is also in the midst of a fundraising campaign to build what it calls a new “Sailing Campus.” When the building is complete, the organization will be able to provide financial management, job search, access to mental health care and other needs for veterans.

Those needs came in the form of preparing for a harsh winter Thursday morning. A mobile “stand down” unit has been deployed inside the Veterans Awareness Center. Volunteers and community partners distributed winter coats, boots and other clothing that men and women will need over the next few weeks.

Employment Services, Legal Assistance, and even the VA Medical Center were also on hand at the event to provide free flu shots, COVID-19 reminders, and help finding jobs.

“We are extremely proud of what we have done here in Kansas City. It’s the flagship and it’s where it all began, it’s the heart and soul of the Veterans Community Project. The possibility of broadcasting this project across the country is a joy. Seeing each city take ownership of the project is what makes us successful,” said Vincent Morales, co-founder of the Veterans Community Project.

If you are a veteran in need of assistance or would like to learn more about the group, the Veterans Community Project website has additional information.

]]>
Celebrity artwork raises nearly £50,000 for Leatherhead veterans charity https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/celebrity-artwork-raises-nearly-50000-for-leatherhead-veterans-charity/ Sat, 06 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/celebrity-artwork-raises-nearly-50000-for-leatherhead-veterans-charity/ Sir Anish Kapoor’s artwork which helped raise money for the charity Submitted for publication in the Dorking Advertiser Celebrities and artists such as Joanna Lumley, Sir Anish Kapoor and Jane Seymour have helped raise £46,166 for mental health charity Combat Stress, based in Leatherhead, Surrey. A total of 48 stars and artists came together, including […]]]>

Sir Anish Kapoor’s artwork which helped raise money for the charity

Submitted for publication in the Dorking Advertiser

Celebrities and artists such as Joanna Lumley, Sir Anish Kapoor and Jane Seymour have helped raise £46,166 for mental health charity Combat Stress, based in Leatherhead, Surrey.

A total of 48 stars and artists came together, including Maureen Lipman, Maggi Hambling CBE, Paul Cummins and Jules George to design postcard-sized works of art for the first-ever secret postcard auction of the charity, which also included works by veterans who benefited from Combat Stress Art Therapy Programme.

For more than a century, the charity has helped former servicemen overcome issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety. Today, Combat Stress focuses on veterans with serious mental health issues resulting from their military service.

The two-week auction, which ended on October 24, was a fantastic success for the charity. Notably, Sir Anish Kapoor’s piece fetched £4,500 and Veterans’ artwork fetched a combined total of £4,010.

Work by Maggi Hambling CBE

The money raised is vital to Combat Stress, helping the charity continue to meet the needs of ex-servicemen who turn to them for help.

Robert Marsh, Fundraising Director at Combat Stress, said: “We are so grateful to the incredible artists, celebrities and veterans, and the generosity of the public, for making our first-ever secret auction of postcards such a success.

“The money raised will help us continue to provide our specialist mental health services to veterans across the UK.

“We are excited for next year’s Secret Postcard Auction, when people will have the opportunity to bid on more fantastic works of art. As this year has proven, it’s a great opportunity to offer you a unique work of art, while showing your support for the men and women who have given so much in the service of this country.

To find out more, visit combatstress.org.uk.

Get all the latest news, updates, things to do and more through Leatherhead’s dedicated InYourArea feed.

]]>
Bonfire night stirs up unwanted memories for veterans, charity warns | United Kingdom | News https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/bonfire-night-stirs-up-unwanted-memories-for-veterans-charity-warns-united-kingdom-news/ Thu, 04 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/bonfire-night-stirs-up-unwanted-memories-for-veterans-charity-warns-united-kingdom-news/ Help for Heroes said the flashes and bangs that fill the sky around Bonfire night can bring back memories of gunfire and explosions on the battlefield. Professor Colin Preece, its Hidden Wounds Wellness Manager, said the sights and sounds of Guy Fawkes Night bring back horrific experiences of conflict for former members of the forces. […]]]>

Help for Heroes said the flashes and bangs that fill the sky around Bonfire night can bring back memories of gunfire and explosions on the battlefield.

Professor Colin Preece, its Hidden Wounds Wellness Manager, said the sights and sounds of Guy Fawkes Night bring back horrific experiences of conflict for former members of the forces.

The charity launched the five-point Firework Heroes Code to highlight the vulnerability of veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.

Organizers want people to attend organized displays rather than garden events and give neighbors ample warning before they set off fireworks.

Professor Preece said: “It has been known for some time. The vast majority of veterans we support with mental health issues tell us they don’t like fireworks.

“It can be the bang and the flashes, but also the smell of the fireworks can be a huge trigger for them.

“These stimuli can remind veterans of the bad times they experienced in combat and make them relive traumatic events in their lives.

“With people who have more severe PTSD, it will almost immediately bring them into a conflict zone, into very strong memories of being in a conflict zone.

“They will have immediate ‘fight or flight’ responses. They will start to sweat, their heart rate will increase, they will become restless and they will feel attacked.

He added: ‘We’re not suggesting that people don’t have fireworks. We are simply asking them to be more attentive and to think of veterans.

In addition to asking people to prefer public displays and giving timely warning of their own displays, the code suggests using “silent” fireworks.

The charity says many former soldiers, sailors and aircrew avoid Bonfire Night celebrations and stay safe inside while others celebrate.

They often need treatment to help them cope with fireworks, which includes progressive levels of exposure with relaxation and desensitization techniques.

Former RAF air craftsman Matt Neve, 36, said he spent the Bonfire night inside, sitting quietly and doing his best to remain calm.

“I despise this time of year. It’s the unexpected detonations of fireworks in people’s homes or on the street that bring me back to where my trauma began and trigger my PTSD. Hearing them scares me and makes me angry, but I also have a physical reaction when I’m shaking and my heart racing.

“I have to pull myself out of the situation and sit somewhere quietly, take deep breaths and prepare to bring myself back to the ‘now’ rather than the trauma I was brought back to.”

Ex-Household Cavalryman Steve Mills, 56, hasn’t liked fireworks since he was diagnosed with PTSD 12 years ago.

He said, “For me, it’s both the sound and the smell; they trigger flashbacks and panic attacks.

“I can feel like I’m having a heart attack, I get hot and clammy, I get headaches and I feel nauseous.

“I’m mentally exhausted by the time Bonfire Night rolls around because people are setting off fireworks weeks before and they keep going for weeks after, until New Years Eve when it all starts again.”

]]>