military veterans – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 14:04:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T112559.751-150x150.jpg military veterans – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ 32 32 Vail Veterans Program welcomes 23 injured service members to the slopes this week https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/vail-veterans-program-welcomes-23-injured-service-members-to-the-slopes-this-week/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/vail-veterans-program-welcomes-23-injured-service-members-to-the-slopes-this-week/ U.S. Army Specialist Crystal Radice-Dunblazier (RET) works on her snowboard turns during the Vail Veterans Program March 6-11.Daniel Milchev/Courtesy Photo From nervous and overwhelmed to now inspiring and grateful, this progression exemplifies what Crystal Radice-Dunblazer, a retired Army nurse, experienced with Vail’s Veterans Program. Radice-Dunblazer is a below the knee amputee and had an amputation […]]]>

U.S. Army Specialist Crystal Radice-Dunblazier (RET) works on her snowboard turns during the Vail Veterans Program March 6-11.
Daniel Milchev/Courtesy Photo

From nervous and overwhelmed to now inspiring and grateful, this progression exemplifies what Crystal Radice-Dunblazer, a retired Army nurse, experienced with Vail’s Veterans Program.

Radice-Dunblazer is a below the knee amputee and had an amputation at Brooke Army Medical Center in San Antonio, TX. She was there for most of 2019 doing pre-surgery physiotherapy and post-amputation rehabilitation. It was while she was there that she was selected to attend the Vail Veterans Program in January 2020 and participate in one of Vail’s non-profit winter family programs.

The Vail Veterans Program provides injured service members and their families with innovative, transformative, and inspirational programs that build confidence and improve lives.



“The family program was my first mountain trip since my amputation. I was very nervous and scared because my amputation was still quite recent, less than a year,” Radice-Dunblazer said.

“I had high hopes of being able to come back there, I had been to Colorado a hundred times for snowboarding trips with my dad, but it was extremely difficult so I ended up doing the ski bike which I fell in love with. It was so much fun.”



Vail’s Veterans Program works with Vail’s Adapted Ski and Snowboard School, which can provide the appropriate equipment and adaptations for the specific needs of veterinarians.

Radice-Dunblazer and her husband, Ryan, also a veteran, and their three children, ages 20, 14 and 11, all hit the slopes.

“It was so wonderful having them with me here and sharing the experiences that I shared with my dad,” Radice-Dunblazer said. “To see their joy of being here learning something new, having so much fun and they got to see me there having fun too, it lifts your spirits so much.”

Radice-Dunblazer was invited back to the Winter Mountain Adventure program on Vail Mountain earlier this week, which is an adult-only program. The Vail Veterans Program hosted 23 injured veterans, 13 guests and four military hospital staff.

The Vail Veterans Program hosted 23 injured military veterans, 13 guests, four military hospital staff and three service dogs for therapeutic time on the trails of the Winter Adventure Program March 6-11 .
Vail Veterans Program/Courtesy Photo

“This week has been amazing! We love our kids, we really love them, and we were so lucky to have brought them the last time we were here, but this trip has been…I’m going to get emotional now…this trip has been such a blessing to us d be able to be absent, just the two of us, and reconnect and enjoy experiences in the mountains. It was so nice to have Ryan by my side during the tough games as well,” Radice-Dunblazer said.

Radice-Dunblazer released their snowboard this year.

“I couldn’t help but smile because it felt so good to be on my board and even though you still deal with some pain issues and some fear and doubt issues mentally, that changes when you you’re on the mountain, it really does. I just couldn’t stop smiling,” Radice-Dunblazer said.

After the first day back on snowboarding, Radice-Dunblazer was in too much pain to ride the next day.

“I was so swollen I couldn’t put my leg up, so I bike-skied all day,” Radice-Dunblazer said. “The good thing about the Vail Veterans program is that they have different types of adaptive equipment and the instructors are so knowledgeable and understand a little more about the limitations that we have as adaptive athletes.”

Vail Adaptive Ski and Snowboard School instructor Charlie Phelan helps veteran Crystal Radice-Dunblazier advance her snowboarding skills.
Daniel Milchev/Courtesy Photo

As an alumnus of the Vail Veterans Program, Radice-Dunblazer could help newbie veterans get the most out of this experience.

“I would tell them it can be nerve wracking, it can be scary not knowing what you’re getting into, but do it anyway. Meeting the challenges here helps translate into other areas of your life.

The Vail Veterans Program offers these events and more free to veterans. To find out more, visit VailVeteransProgram.org.

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SBA Seeks Candidates for Veterans Program | Business https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/sba-seeks-candidates-for-veterans-program-business/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 15:35:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/sba-seeks-candidates-for-veterans-program-business/ the US Small Business Administration invites eligible nonprofit organizations, state and local government agencies, private sector companies, and institutions of higher education to submit proposals to provide synchronous online entrepreneurship training to transitioning military, veterans, and military spouses. The training will be a continuation of the training participants receive through the SBA’s Boots to Business […]]]>

the US Small Business Administration invites eligible nonprofit organizations, state and local government agencies, private sector companies, and institutions of higher education to submit proposals to provide synchronous online entrepreneurship training to transitioning military, veterans, and military spouses.

The training will be a continuation of the training participants receive through the SBA’s Boots to Business training program.

The SBA expects to award a cooperative agreement based on this announcement. For specific instructions on obtaining, completing and submitting an application, visit grants.gov and search for opportunity number SB-OVB2-22-002 or CFDA 59.044.

Proposals submitted through other media, including the SBA website, will be rejected and not evaluated. Submissions should be sent via grants.gov no later than 11:59 p.m. on April 11.

The SBA Veterans Affairs Development Office will host an information session at 2 p.m. on March 18 to answer questions about the funding opportunity. Information: sba.gov.

Questions about B2B financing can be submitted to Jerry Godwin at jerry.godwin@sba.gov by 5 p.m. March 16.

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A clearer CPL path for veteran students – Community College Daily https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/a-clearer-cpl-path-for-veteran-students-community-college-daily/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 16:50:33 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/a-clearer-cpl-path-for-veteran-students-community-college-daily/ Virginia in recent months has improved its Credits2Careers Portal aimed at adult learners, including military personnel who would like to attend community colleges. He is ready to go live with a second effort, the Virginia Transfer Portalwhich focuses a bit more broadly, though veterans can use either, according to Emily Jones-Green, prior learning credits coordinator […]]]>

Virginia in recent months has improved its Credits2Careers Portal aimed at adult learners, including military personnel who would like to attend community colleges.

He is ready to go live with a second effort, the Virginia Transfer Portalwhich focuses a bit more broadly, though veterans can use either, according to Emily Jones-Green, prior learning credits coordinator with the Virginia Community College System (VCCS).

“There’s a designated place on Credits2Careers that specifically explains how it works for military learners,” she says. “We use their language directly on our main pages.”

Editor’s Note: This article is the second in a two-part series about the state’s efforts to help student veterans earn credit for their prior learning experiences. Read the first article.

Launched about five years ago, Credits2Careers, which all Virginia community colleges participate in, initially focused only on the military but has since expanded, Jones-Green says.

“We are still working on industry certification,” she notes.

Each college within the VCCS itself determines which credits are awarded, as with any certification or academic course from another institution, says Jones-Green.

“We’re trying to make it a little more standardized,” she says. “Instead of each institution’s faculty, it would be a statewide peer group meeting to review the recommendations.”

Work on various parts

The state’s four-year institutions haven’t been as actively involved, though they’ve agreed that community college credits can count for general education, at the very least, says Patricia Parker, director of Transfer Virginia, housed at the State Council on Higher Education. For major credits, however, “each institution will determine whether they will accept the CPL [credit for prior learning] credentials,” she says.

Transfer Virginia, which will be fully operational in April with 35 schools and hopes to expand to at least 50 by the end of the year, focuses on higher education, generally whether students start at a college in two years or go directly to a four-year campus, says Parker.

“The Credits2Careers portal is for students who absolutely want to start with an associate degree, who bring military or industrial degrees,” she says.

Challenges and progress

Credits2Careers is designed to refocus short-term degree programs as a pathway to longer-term goals, says Jones-Green. But involving teachers can be a challenge.

“Sometimes it’s hard for professors to understand that they’re not giving credit—they’re helping a student grow,” she adds. “Additionally, there is concern that the system office dictates what should be awarded. That’s not what we’re trying to do.

Before Credits2Careers went online, students coming out of the military had trouble transferring credits and often had to repeat core material, Parker says. Today, the portal offers over 20,000 military courses and other experiences that can be combined.

“We keep this up to date and try to get everyone on the same page,” she says.

She adds, “What we’re trying to do as a team is to make sure the portal works functionally for students and staff. It’s the good thing to work together and do as many checks as we do. We are able to talk through things [and] make quick changes for prospective student satisfaction and ease of use. »

Aim for uniformity

Ohio began military articulation efforts after a chancellor’s directive in 2011, followed by legislation in 2014 that required the public system to assess military credit for college credit, says Jared Shank, senior director of military and learning initiatives and special projects for the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Networkhoused within the Ohio Department of Higher Education.

Ohio’s transfer system is built on a common course numbering system between two- and four-year institutions, and the system attempted to treat the military as an additional Ohio public institution, Shank says. Panels of faculty from community colleges as well as four-year institutions like The Ohio State University and the University of Cincinnati meet to decide whether a given military course passes the CPL.

“Military credit is assessed equally across our 36 institutions,” he says. “If you have a military electronics course and the ACE [American Council on Education] recommendation is six credit hours in DC electronics, each institution will get six hours.

When states evaluate at the institutional level, it “enables credit shopping, and a member of the service is going to ask, ‘Why is this different everywhere?'” he adds. “In Ohio, it’s something we’ve tried to eliminate, so it’s more consistent.”

the Transfer to the diploma guarantee The search engine has several tabs to click on, including one for military veterans, Shank says.

“We watched [other efforts] across the country to figure out how to display the most accurate information with what we’re doing in the state,” he says. “As we get new courses approved for statewide warranty, they are added to this system.”

Engage teachers

Ohio, which participates in a multistate military credit collaboration coordinated by the Midwest Higher Education Compact, also needed to spend time with faculty to explain how the system would work, Shank said.

“Unless a faculty member is a former service member, they have no idea what the military is doing on a college course,” he says. “They might say a course is only four weeks, but in many cases that four weeks is 8 to 5, every day.”

The state network also needed to explain ACE assessments and how they work, Shank says, and faculty had many questions about how the system might affect program or school accreditation, whether regionally or by industry. But the state has been given assurances on those fronts, and at this point “faculty don’t question any kind of academic rigor or accreditation,” he says. “Now it’s, ‘Can we get enough information to rate the course?'”

Other goals

Going forward, the Ohio Articulation and Transfer Network would like to combine CPL searches among military and other sources, Shank said. Some service members not only come with military credits, but also with AP credits, dual enrollment, or other experiences to consider.

“We are trying to grow so [colleges] can see a glimpse of their academic journey at the same time,” he says. “I don’t know how soon that will happen.”

The network would also like to start integrating experiences across the US Military Apprenticeship Program which often parallel those offered at Ohio community colleges through US Department of Labor grants, Shank says.

He explains, “We try to educate them about the opportunity in the military and use that as an outreach tool to tell them, ‘We have an electronics apprenticeship program; if you have completed this part of [military] training, you have three-quarters or more of the credits you need. We haven’t integrated them into the search engine functionality yet, but we’d love to. »

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DMV is working toward a “self-sufficient military veteran community” https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/dmv-is-working-toward-a-self-sufficient-military-veteran-community/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 11:18:34 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/dmv-is-working-toward-a-self-sufficient-military-veteran-community/ A SAMHS warrant officer assists a veteran during a parade. The Department of Military Veterans (DMV) maintains that it is making progress in its “quest to provide a dignified, unified, self-reliant, and self-reliant military veteran community.” A DMV statement, released a day before its Executive Director Irene Mpolweni’s appearance at a scheduled meeting of the […]]]>

The Department of Military Veterans (DMV) maintains that it is making progress in its “quest to provide a dignified, unified, self-reliant, and self-reliant military veteran community.”

A DMV statement, released a day before its Executive Director Irene Mpolweni’s appearance at a scheduled meeting of the House Defense Portfolio and Veterans Affairs Committee (PCDMV), says DMV support enables veterans to contribute to nation building and reconciliation. This is being done through partnerships to “enhance and sustain the livelihoods of the military veteran community,” according to the statement released by DMV media liaison Lebogang Mothapa.

As part of its mandate, the DMV has provided educational support to military veterans and their dependents since fiscal year 2013/14. In the current fiscal year, 1,978 primary education learners are enrolled with DMV scholarships and 644 higher education scholarships have been approved for the same period.

The statement notes, “There have been difficulties with the administration of the scholarships due to schools’ non-compliance on tax matters and the submission of unpaid bills from schools and colleges.”

“The DMV has supported over 400 graduates since the scholarship’s inception. The list includes qualified doctors, engineers and lawyers, among various esteemed professions.

As for vocational training, the statement presents it as “an ongoing key component” of its overall military veteran support program.

Earlier this year, 149 veterans were trained as peace officers in partnership with PRASA (Passenger Rail Agency of SA) at Koeberg Training Center in Western Cape.

Another skills development project is digital literacy, with training carried out in collaboration with SITA (National Information Technology Agency). This happens over a three-year period, boosting employability and entrepreneurship among veterans. From the statement, it appears that the first “admission” – so to speak – took place earlier this month (February) when “more than 80 Gauteng-based military veterans and their dependents” began a digital literacy training at Vaal University of Technology (VUT) in Vanderbijlpark.

The statement ends with an update on the DMV database indicating that the finalization of the integrated database management system (IDMS) will be launched “soon”.

“IDMS will ensure a credible, secure and reliable electronic system for the service and benefit of military veterans.”

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ROKiT to support UK veterans’ charitable post-fight care https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/rokit-to-support-uk-veterans-charitable-post-fight-care/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/rokit-to-support-uk-veterans-charitable-post-fight-care/ Care after Combat provides support within the criminal justice system for the well-being of former members of the UK Armed Forces and their families, through a one-on-one mentorship program inside and outside prison, the mentors being veterans themselves. Care after Combat works with individuals to get them where they deserve to be in society at […]]]>

Care after Combat provides support within the criminal justice system for the well-being of former members of the UK Armed Forces and their families, through a one-on-one mentorship program inside and outside prison, the mentors being veterans themselves. Care after Combat works with individuals to get them where they deserve to be in society at large and to reduce recidivism rates. What Care after Combat provides really works; most of those helped by the charity do not return to prison and truly succeed in life within the wider civilian community, making a positive contribution to society.

Commenting, Jonathan Kendrick said: “Many military veterans really struggle with civilian life once they leave the services. As a result and for a variety of reasons, many veterans end up in the criminal justice system and, although I think While society in general fails to provide veterans with sufficient personal support, charities such as Care after Combat are doing a fantastic job helping hundreds of veterans during and after their release from prison. and proud to be able to support Care after Combat, not only with direct financial assistance, but we will also be placing the Care after Combat logos on our cars and driver suits that will be racing in the British Touring Car Championship this season, to raise awareness of the public about the charity and the very important work it does.”

Adrian KirkCEO of Care after Combat, said, “The entire Care after Combat team is thrilled to have the support of ROKiT. It is very clear that Jonathan shares our passion for supporting veterans of the British Armed Forces and I am truly grateful to him that he has chosen to support Care after Combat in what we do. ROKiT’s support will have a direct impact on the lives and life chances of the veterans we help.

Co-founded by entrepreneurs Jonathan Kendrick and Jean-Paul DeJoriathe ROKiT group of companies has a diverse portfolio of innovative technologies, premium products and pioneering services, including mobile phones, smart Wi-Fi technologies, beverage brands, e-bikes, payment cards , 3D content production, product development and global content distribution and is heavily involved in a number of sponsorship programs to help promote the growth of these businesses and services including Formula E, IndyCar, BTCC, DTM, NHRA and others.

More information at https://www.careaftercombat.org/ and https://therokitgroup.com/

Visual of by Jake Hill BMW M3 that will participate in the BTCC 2022 with the Care after Combat logo

Photo – https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1741203/ROKiT_BMW_330e.jpg

ROKIT SOURCE

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Ohio Legion Riders supports critical veterans program https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ohio-legion-riders-supports-critical-veterans-program/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 18:22:04 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ohio-legion-riders-supports-critical-veterans-program/ For more than 20 years, Chapter 25 of the American Legion Riders in Washington Court House, Ohio, has held a Polar Bear Run in January to raise funds and collect canned goods and other items to help veterans. . For the past few years, the chapter has used the ride to raise money for the […]]]>

For more than 20 years, Chapter 25 of the American Legion Riders in Washington Court House, Ohio, has held a Polar Bear Run in January to raise funds and collect canned goods and other items to help veterans. .

For the past few years, the chapter has used the ride to raise money for the Military Veterans Resource Center in nearby Chillicothe. The center provides services to all U.S. Army veterans, with the goal of “helping veterans regain their self-reliance and independence.” Each veteran who uses the center’s services is assigned a veteran services specialist or coach to assist them.

This year, Chapter 25 wanted to do something a little different, and the timing couldn’t have been better. The icy roads forced the cancellation of the actual Polar Bear Run, so instead, Chapter 25 – with the support and help of the rest of the Post 25 American Legion family – held a “22 a Day Benefit” to raise awareness of veteran suicides.

“We didn’t want it to be the same year after year,” said Tracy Thomas, ALR Chapter 25 Director, a member of Auxiliary Unit 25. “We wanted to change things up a bit and bring the Pay attention not only to the polar bear race, but the Legion itself as a whole…and the (suicide awareness) benefit.

In a typical year, Thomas said the Polar Bear Run will attract both American Legion riders and other area motorcyclists who ignore the cold temperatures of the Midwest to participate.

“It can be cold at times, but we do it anyway, provided the weather isn’t dangerous,” Thomas said. “We give out trophies generally for the youngest rider, the oldest and the one who rides the farthest. And, of course, we welcome anyone who doesn’t ride.

Unable to roll this year, Post 25 instead held an event that included a breakfast, DJ, raffle and other fundraisers. The post accepted both monetary donations totaling over $4,000 and non-perishable items, which were provided to the Military Veterans Resource Center.

“They don’t support any specific area. They support Ohio in general,” Thomas said of the center. “They will pick up the donated items anywhere and they will deliver to veterans all over Ohio. They have shown us that they have succeeded in what they do and that they get good results from it.

That’s why Chapter 25 provides support to the center, which Thomas says can have an impact on reducing veteran suicides. “(Receiving help from the center) can reduce their stress level if they receive help in some way,” she said. “It can be one less stressor they have to deal with and allow them to think more clearly and know there is help out there.”

Thomas said she had been a member of Chapter 25 for about three years and was motivated to take on a leadership role because of her background.

“My dad and mom both did (motorcycles) when I was young, and I ride myself,” she said. “My brother, my father and my grandparents were all in the military. To me, it was a way for me to give back since I didn’t serve. He supports veterans.

“On top of that, I’m also a nurse, so I deal with a lot of veterans in my job. It helps me better understand veterans and the daily challenges they face.

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British Curry Day at Atherstone will raise money for veterans’ charity https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/british-curry-day-at-atherstone-will-raise-money-for-veterans-charity/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/british-curry-day-at-atherstone-will-raise-money-for-veterans-charity/ Pic: Maya Bar and Restaurant is raising funds for veterans Submitted by Angela Belassie A restaurant in Atherstone is raising money for a veterans’ charity by commemorating the ancestors who introduced the British to a taste of India. British Curry Day was launched to mark those who came to Britain from the 1960s, opening restaurants […]]]>

Pic: Maya Bar and Restaurant is raising funds for veterans

Submitted by Angela Belassie

A restaurant in Atherstone is raising money for a veterans’ charity by commemorating the ancestors who introduced the British to a taste of India.

British Curry Day was launched to mark those who came to Britain from the 1960s, opening restaurants and takeaways, and to show support for the industry today.

Maya Bar and Restaurant on Sheepy Road in Atherstone, North Warwickshire, has announced it will donate £1 to the Veterans Contact Point (VCP), appointed by North Warwickshire MP Craig Tracey, for each Tikka Masala sold in December.

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Kamal Miah, who runs Maya Restaurant and is the third generation in the industry, said: “We want to celebrate our ancestors who had the resilience to build what is now a billion pound industry.

“Many families have benefited from the profession – either working in industry or having the opportunity to pursue other vocations – be it medicine, engineering or law – as a result.

“I believe in helping those in need and it really is a team effort.”

Kamal, 47, who came to the UK from Bangladesh aged six, grew up in Lozells and ran his first restaurant aged 19.

The former St Francis pupil quickly learned English and adapted to a new way of life. His father worked two jobs – in a factory and in a restaurant, his grandfather opened a restaurant in Sparkhill, and his older brother and uncle were also in the industry.

Kamal, a father of six, who started helping in the kitchen at the age of 14, said: “Restaurant life is in my blood. I knew I would work in the trade – unless I became a famous footballer.

Kamal, whose maternal grandfather was in the British Navy (HMS Cambridge), said he grew up with the “best of both worlds” combining the two cultures.

He added: “I believe people of my generation have created variations on the traditional curry and added a modern twist to it.”

But the industry has faced its share of challenges, especially in the wake of the pandemic.

Kamal, who set up a takeaway in Nuneaton during the pandemic, also struggled to recruit staff due to work permit issues.

He said: “It has been a difficult time – from dealing with lockdowns, cancellations due to Covid, difficulties getting supplies and staffing issues.

“But we have very favorable customers. We are always open. We are still negotiating. We are still healthy. We are grateful.

British Curry Day coincides with 50 years of independence in Bangladesh and is a national holiday in the country on December 16.

And the event will raise funds for the Atherstone and Dordon Veterans Point of Contact (VCP), chosen by Mr Tracey.

The centers are run by military veterans for veterans who live in the Coventry, Solihull and Warwickshire (CSW) area.

Mr Tracey said he was delighted to support British Curry Day and VCP with Maya, who were also part of the Food4NHS project – delivering meals to frontline workers.

He said: “British curry is full of cultural integration and the heritage built up over the past decades has helped to make it the nation’s favorite dish.

“It has been fascinating to learn more about Bangladeshi heritage and both the history of their curry pioneers, as well as the importance placed on caring for their community, which is reflected very well in their generosity in supporting the VCP.

“I would also like to convey my congratulations to the Bangladeshi community on this 50th year of independence.”

Kamal, who received a community support award from Warwickshire High Sheriff and Deputy Lieutenant Joe Greenwell, said: “It has been a difficult time for many people. I have lost friends to Covid and I know many have struggled.

Tam Webster, peer support manager at the Armed Forces charity’s Veterans Contact Point, said: ‘We are delighted that British Curry Day, which marks the nation’s favorite dish and links to independence of Bangladesh, support our charity. This will help us continue to develop our services to veterans.

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‘We Appreciate Our Veterans’ Community Award goes to Monmouth County Clerk’s Office https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/we-appreciate-our-veterans-community-award-goes-to-monmouth-county-clerks-office/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/we-appreciate-our-veterans-community-award-goes-to-monmouth-county-clerks-office/ FREEHOLD, NJ – Monmouth County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon is pleased to announce that the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office was named the 2021 “We Value our Veterans” Community Award Recipient by the New Jersey Department of Military and Veteran Affairs. The award will be presented on Veterans Day, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. at the […]]]>

FREEHOLD, NJ – Monmouth County Clerk Christine Giordano Hanlon is pleased to announce that the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office was named the 2021 “We Value our Veterans” Community Award Recipient by the New Jersey Department of Military and Veteran Affairs. The award will be presented on Veterans Day, Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. at the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial in Holmdel.

“We are proud to accept this award and thank the New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs for this great honor,” Registrar Hanlon said. “Our office takes great pride in serving the residents of Monmouth County and the more than 33,000 veterans who call Monmouth County home.”

Under state law, the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office has the authority to issue Veterans Identification Cards, Veterans Peddler Licenses, and Gold Star Parent Cards. In 2015, when Hanlon took over as Monmouth County Clerk, she launched the “Honoring our Heroes” military appreciation program to encourage local businesses to sign up to provide a special veterans discount or service. County and Gold Star parents.

Veterans who obtain the Monmouth County Clerk’s Veterans Identification Card receive a 50+ page guide that lists Monmouth County stores, restaurants and businesses that offer products and service discounts to veterans. veterans and Gold Star parents. Businesses that participate in Clerk Hanlon’s “Honoring our Heroes” military appreciation program receive specially designed window decals, donated by members of Asbury Park VFW Harold Daley Post 1333, to place in their establishments.

The “Honoring our Heroes” discount guide has grown to include over 200 participating businesses and the County Clerk’s Office is offering this book for free in our office, as well as at veterans fairs and local events to help to inform about our veterans ID card and program. The guide’s business listings are also available to all residents online in a regularly updated spreadsheet online at MonmouthCountyClerk.com.


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Two years ago, Clerk Hanlon designated a veterans parking spot outside the main office of the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office in Freehold Borough. With more than 500 veterans visiting the county clerk’s office each year, the parking space was essential and provides veterans with easier access to the office.

The Monmouth County Clerk’s Office takes great pride in serving our veteran community. Each year, Clerk Hanlon and employees of the County Clerk’s Office attend local veterans’ events and meetings throughout the county to educate about our office’s services and to provide those same services on the go.

The New Jersey Department of Military and Veterans Affairs annually recognizes counties, municipalities, businesses and institutions for their efforts to support veterans with the Governor’s prestigious “We Appreciate Our Veterans” Award.

The award is given based on the number of programs and services the city makes available to its veterans, using a point system. This year, five counties, fifteen municipalities, two businesses and five academic institutions will be recognized at the Veterans Day ceremony.

For more information about Monmouth County Clerk’s Veterans Services, please visit our website at MonmouthCountyClerk.com.

If you have any questions, please contact the Monmouth County Clerk’s Office by phone at 732-431-7324 or by email at [email protected].


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Hoʻōla Farms Receives Grant to Support Veterans Program https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ho%ca%bbola-farms-receives-grant-to-support-veterans-program/ Fri, 29 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ho%ca%bbola-farms-receives-grant-to-support-veterans-program/ A nonprofit farm in Hilo is set to receive federal funding for the next three years to support its program that teaches agriculture to veterans. Hoʻōla Veteran Services – the nonprofit home of Hoʻōla Farms – received a 3-year, $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) ( […]]]>

A nonprofit farm in Hilo is set to receive federal funding for the next three years to support its program that teaches agriculture to veterans.

Hoʻōla Veteran Services – the nonprofit home of Hoʻōla Farms – received a 3-year, $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) ( USDA) to support their pilot “Bridging the Gap: Growing Veterans” program.

Courtesy of Hoʻōla Veteran Services.

The Hoʻōla program is designed to support entry-level military veterans, ranchers, and their families on the island of Hawaiʻi by providing exposure, skills-based training, and a professional network aimed at helping them succeed in careers. farms, according to a press release from the non-profit organization.

“Over the past few years, we have recognized that one of the barriers to entry for veterans and their families into the agricultural sector is the lack of access to hands-on, exposure-based experiences,” said Emily Emmons, executive director of Hoʻōla Farms. . “This new funding will help us increase the number of veterans seeking and securing opportunities in education, employment and entrepreneurship in the food and agriculture sector on the island of Hawaii. We are thrilled and grateful to have this opportunity to expand and strengthen the network of veterans working in agriculture here.

According to the statement, the farm holds workshops for veterans, their families and civilians to learn more about agriculture. Programs range from one day, “Intro to Grow”, to a more comprehensive four week workshop, “Groundwork to Grow”.

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The four-week course focuses on specific agricultural topics relevant to the Pacific region, the statement said. Experts and guest speakers from organizations such as the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR), UH-Hilo, USDA, and the US Forest Service will provide additional resources to support participants’ goals.

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Hoʻōla Farms will soon be offering scholarships to participate in the pilot program. Those who are interested or want additional information can visit www.hoolafarms.org or call 808-494-2613.

Hoʻōla Farms was one of 140 organizations nationwide to receive funding from the USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

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military and veterans program to hold a haunted tour of the Texas Tech campus on October 29 | KLBK | KAMC https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/military-and-veterans-program-to-hold-a-haunted-tour-of-the-texas-tech-campus-on-october-29-klbk-kamc/ Mon, 25 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/military-and-veterans-program-to-hold-a-haunted-tour-of-the-texas-tech-campus-on-october-29-klbk-kamc/ LUBBOCK, Texas (PRESS RELEASE) — Here is a press release from Texas Tech University: the Military and veterans program (MVP) is in partnership with the Raider Power of Paranormal Student Organization to organize ghost tours of the Texas University of Technology Campus. The fundraiser dubbed “Frightraiser” will feature stories of paranormal experiences that have happened […]]]>

LUBBOCK, Texas (PRESS RELEASE) — Here is a press release from Texas Tech University:

the Military and veterans program (MVP) is in partnership with the Raider Power of Paranormal Student Organization to organize ghost tours of the Texas University of Technology Campus.

The fundraiser dubbed “Frightraiser” will feature stories of paranormal experiences that have happened on campus.

On Friday (October 29), participants can arrive between the Student Union Building and the Library from 8:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Participants will then depart for a 45-minute tour through campus.

“Our ghost tour invites participants to accompany an investigator carrying a lantern and make their way through campus where they will meet storytellers,” said Garret D. Langlois, the Raider Power Paranormal Advisor.

“Each story is unique, and their sources range from legends passed down between generations of students and still whispered in dorms today, to real-life tragedies that have left a permanent scar on Raiderland,” said Michael Harper, program coordinator for MVP.

General admission is $5 and free for children three and under. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Raider Power of Paranormal.

Sierra Mello-Miles, director of MPV, said the idea of ​​ghost tours for a fundraiser came up during a staff meeting with Harper.

“I was recounting my experiences growing up around college, and ghost stories inevitably arose,” Harper said. “I had heard several stories growing up both as an employee’s child and as a student.”

Mello-Miles said she suggested the ghost tours on the spur of the moment. She contacted the Campus Life Center on the idea and learned about the student organization that held ghost tours during this year’s welcome week.

Raider Power of Paranormal was created in 2019 by three college students with the help of their advisor. Since the beginning of the semester, when the first ghost tours were organized, Raider Power of Paranormal has grown from 14 members to 164.

(Texas Tech University press release)

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