veterans community – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 06:05:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/02/icon-2022-02-04T112559.751-150x150.jpg veterans community – United Children of Veterans http://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/ 32 32 Keen Wealth Advisors donates its time to the Veterans Community Project https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/keen-wealth-advisors-donates-its-time-to-the-veterans-community-project/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 12:42:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/keen-wealth-advisors-donates-its-time-to-the-veterans-community-project/ The Keen Wealth team has spent time volunteering with the Veterans Community Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to ending veteran homelessness nationwide. OVERLAND PARK, Kan., March 16, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Wealth Management Advisorsa financial advisory firm based in Overland Park, Kansasis proud to announce that its team donated its time by volunteering with the Veterans […]]]>

The Keen Wealth team has spent time volunteering with the Veterans Community Project, a non-profit organization dedicated to ending veteran homelessness nationwide.

OVERLAND PARK, Kan., March 16, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Wealth Management Advisorsa financial advisory firm based in Overland Park, Kansasis proud to announce that its team donated its time by volunteering with the Veterans Community Project (VCP), a non-profit organization, independent of federal funding, dedicated to ending homelessness among veterans nationwide.

“VCP is transforming cities across the country, and 90% of the veterans they help get back on their feet and reacclimate to society,” says Bill Keen, founder and CEO of Keen Wealth Advisors. “They make a huge difference to from Kansas City veterans, and the Keen Wealth team is grateful to help. »

Unfortunately, many veterans do not receive the services they need because access is complex and difficult to navigate. According to a recent study by the Department of Veterans Affairs14 of the 20 veterans who die by suicide every day were not connected to the VA or another support agency.

In June 2021, the Bill and Carissa Keen Charitable Foundation and Keen Wealth Advisors awarded a $100,000 grant to develop the Veterans Navigation Campus at Kansas City, Missouri. This innovative initiative will harness the collective power of the local veterans services community and a coalition of trusted partners, including local nonprofits and businesses, to help veterans in their areas of expertise. respective.

“VCP is called a community project for a reason,” says Brandon Mixon, co-founder of VCP, project manager and retired US Army specialist. “Community partners like the Keen family and Keen Wealth Advisors are the reason we can do what we do.”

About Keen Wealth Advisors
As an SEC-registered investment advisory firm, Keen Wealth Advisors is focused on providing personalized financial planning designed to help people thrive before and during their retirement years.

Keen Wealth Advisors was founded by CEO Bill Keen, a licensed retirement planning advisor℠ and financial advisor with 28 years of industry experience. Reflecting his passion for educating others, Bill co-hosts the “Want to retirepodcast and is the author of Want to retirea book focused on the common steps in developing a financial plan and the psychological and emotional challenges associated with retirement.

Keen Wealth Advisors also serves Kansas areas Prairie Village, Leawood, Lenexa.

For more information, visit www.KeenWealthAdvisors.com.

Media Contact
Haley Crawford
6201, boul. of the College Suite 325
Overland Park, KS 66211
913-294-9855
[email protected]

SOURCE Wealth Management Advisors

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Sanning embraces a passion for supporting veterans, the community https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/sanning-embraces-a-passion-for-supporting-veterans-the-community/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 02:50:25 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/sanning-embraces-a-passion-for-supporting-veterans-the-community/ Born into a military family, Dotty Sanning grew up in many places while her parents made careers in the United States Air Force and in the federal civilian workforce. Years later, she married a Marine, once again adopting an itinerant lifestyle while developing a lifelong interest in activities to support and honor the country’s veterans. […]]]>

Born into a military family, Dotty Sanning grew up in many places while her parents made careers in the United States Air Force and in the federal civilian workforce.

Years later, she married a Marine, once again adopting an itinerant lifestyle while developing a lifelong interest in activities to support and honor the country’s veterans.

Born at Chanute Air Force Base in Illinois, Sanning’s father brought the family with him on several interesting military assignments, including missions in the United States and several years of living in France.

“I attended high school for a while in Easthampton, Massachusetts, but during Christmas break my senior year we moved to Kansas City,” Sanning said. “I graduated from Ruskin High School in 1975 and later married someone in the Air Force, with whom I had a daughter in 1977.”

She and her first husband later divorced, influencing her decision to move to Arizona, where her mother was employed as a civil servant. In 1979, she and her daughter moved to California, embarking on an interesting new time in her life.

“When I was living in California, I met Alan Sanning, who had been in the Marine Corps for a few years and was stationed at Camp Pendleton,” she said.

In 1981, the former Dotty McRae became Dotty Sanning, marrying his fiancée. Over the next few years, his family grew with the addition of two daughters and a son, as they traveled to several locations and Alan finished his career with the Marine Corps.

“Each time we moved to a new duty station, I first stayed home with the kids until everyone was settled, then I got a job,” he said. she declared. “That’s why it took me about 25 years to graduate from college.”

With each posting change, Sanning explained, she became involved in different groups and activities that supported active duty service members. While her husband was stationed at Camp Pendleton, this included joining the Staff NCO Wives’ Club.

“Eventually I became president of the club and I really enjoyed it,” she said. “It wasn’t just because of the camaraderie with other women in the group, but we were involved in activities that were of service to others, something my parents instilled in me from an early age.”

In the late 1990s, when her husband retired from the Marine Corps, the Sanning family moved to Alan’s hometown of Jefferson City. With some of their children still in their youth, Alan stayed home with their younger children while Dotty worked.

Employed briefly for a few different medical facilities, Sanning was eventually hired by the Jefferson City Department of Parks, Recreation and Forestry. Until her retirement in 2019, she performed a range of administrative duties including budgeting, finance and accounting.

“Before my husband left the Marines, he joined the Marine Corps League,” Sanning said. “After we moved to Jefferson City, he suggested I join the Marine Corps League Auxiliary, which I did.”

Fully invested in the auxiliary, Sanning rose through the ranks with the local Marine Corps League Auxiliary unit and went on to serve in several state and national capacities within the organization. Currently, she is the National Junior Vice President of the Marine Corps League Auxiliary.

“I love meeting people at all of our events, the camaraderie and being able to help others,” she said.

Sanning also became a member of the Marine Corps League Auxiliary Unit at Lake Ozark, assisting the group in numerous charitable endeavors. Additionally, she is currently helping an auxiliary unit organize in Maryland, drawing on her extensive experience as a volunteer at various levels within the organization.

“Wherever there is a need, the auxiliary tries to be there and help,” she said. “We collected items to support the Rape and Abuse Crisis Center; on another occasion, we bought supplies and painted the bathrooms for the Special Learning Center. Then, she added, there are also the care packages that we have sent to our deployed troops and veterans in nursing homes.

Seeking to be part of an organization that supports veterans from all branches of the military, Sanning also became a member of the American Legion Auxiliary in Jefferson City.

“The Legion Auxiliary does many service projects that are different from the Marine Corps League Auxiliary, but everything we do helps veterans and the community, like giving time, money and items at the VA hospital.”

As Sanning has argued, she was imbued with a great respect for the military and a sense of public service from an early age. These were the first lessons she passed on successfully, as evidenced by the fact that three of her four children went on to serve in the military.

“There’s always a new or different need that comes up that we’re happy to help with…whether it’s a project graduation, donations to the fire department during Fire Safety Week or making blankets for veterans in the hospital,” she said.

She concluded: “When you volunteer, I have found that not only is it important to be able to effectively channel that passion, but you also have to be a leader, striving to encourage and mentor others. volunteers so that they may succeed as well.”

Jeremy P. Ämick writes on behalf of the Silver Star Families of America.

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Local Veterans Program Liberty Place Receives $50,000 ARP Grant | News https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/local-veterans-program-liberty-place-receives-50000-arp-grant-news/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 21:28:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/local-veterans-program-liberty-place-receives-50000-arp-grant-news/ NEW ALBANY — Supporting a local veterans program encompasses both city and U.S. bailout missions, according to New Albany Redevelopment Commission member Adam Dickey. Kaiser Home Support Services’ veteran program, Liberty Place, will receive a $50,000 grant from the ARP Fund to continue providing its services. The Transitional Living Facility aims to help veterans in […]]]>

NEW ALBANY — Supporting a local veterans program encompasses both city and U.S. bailout missions, according to New Albany Redevelopment Commission member Adam Dickey.

Kaiser Home Support Services’ veteran program, Liberty Place, will receive a $50,000 grant from the ARP Fund to continue providing its services. The Transitional Living Facility aims to help veterans in the community who are experiencing homelessness.

The facility houses approximately 16 residents who typically stay for 12 to 18 months, although there is no set time frame for completing the program.

Economic Development and Redevelopment Director Josh Staten said the organization can use the grant for a variety of needs, from supplies to case management.

“We’ll work with them on whatever they’d like to use this grant for to make sure it meets all ARPA guidelines, but two, that it…gives them the opportunity to do their work the best they can can,” Staten said.

Dickey said at Tuesday’s redevelopment commission meeting that this grant is a great way to couple the mission of serving veterans and helping those affected by COVID-19.

“When I see a proposal like this come forward, I think it exemplifies us as a city not only doing our due diligence to meet rescue needs, but also putting programs in place that help a very appreciated by our community,” he said. noted.

Both Dickey and Commissioner Chair Irving Joshua said that in the past they felt veterans had been underserved.

In the United States, Joshua said veterans have traditionally not been offered the support they need once they return from military service.

“It’s always been difficult for individuals, for veterans to come back and reintegrate into society,” Joshua said, “it’s just not traditionally in the country a really conservative effort.”

Joshua said there needs to be more emphasis on transitioning veterans back into society, and Liberty Place catering specifically to homeless veterans is unique.

The commission voted unanimously to award the grant to Liberty Place.

At Tuesday’s meeting, commission members also decided to buy a property at 715 Vincennes Street for $125,000. The space at the corner of Avenue Ekin and Rue Vincennes was once an automobile shop.

Staten told the commission that the space will likely be demolished and something else will be rebuilt in its place. With the Uptown area, Staten said, they tried to meet multiple needs, from new housing to mixed-use spaces, like Mickey’s.

Engineering and sizing associated with the site and other aspects are going to be evaluated before the city makes a decision on what will fill the space, Staten said.

“Uptown has such a unique and really cool vibe and it’s important to us that Uptown continues to build in its own way and that we don’t copy other neighborhoods,” he said.

Commissioner Jason Applegate said this was another public investment opportunity, with private investment to follow.

“I’ve been in New Albany most of my life, Vincennes is a different street than it was many years ago,” Applegate said.

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Kansas City Veterans Community Project puts finishing touches on Parade of Hearts entrance https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-puts-finishing-touches-on-parade-of-hearts-entrance/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 01:18:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-puts-finishing-touches-on-parade-of-hearts-entrance/ COMMUNITY. SYMBOLS OF LOVE AND UNITY, IN HONOR OF KANS CASITY AND PEOPLE AND PETS, THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE AT THE PARADE OF HEART.TS >> ARTISTS MADE THINGS STUNNING WITH THEIR HEARTS. SOME PEOPLE HAVE PAINTED THEM, SOME MADE LGEAR SCULPTURES, AND OURS IAS MOSAIC. KELLY: VETERAN COMMUNITY PROJECT PUT THE FINISHING TOUCH ON THEIR […]]]>

COMMUNITY. SYMBOLS OF LOVE AND UNITY, IN HONOR OF KANS CASITY AND PEOPLE AND PETS, THERE’S SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE AT THE PARADE OF HEART.TS >> ARTISTS MADE THINGS STUNNING WITH THEIR HEARTS. SOME PEOPLE HAVE PAINTED THEM, SOME MADE LGEAR SCULPTURES, AND OURS IAS MOSAIC. KELLY: VETERAN COMMUNITY PROJECT PUT THE FINISHING TOUCH ON THEIR HEARTS.RT >> WE HAVE THE TINY HOUSES, COMMUNITY CENTER ON ONE SIDE. KELLY: ONE OF 154 HEARTS ABOUT TO BE PLACEDCR AOSS THE METRO. >> AND THE HOUSES ARE ALL COLORED ACCORDING TO THE DIFFERENT BRANCHES OF THE ARMY. KELLY: THE PROJECT, BRING A SPECIAL SENSE TO VCP’S MISSION TO HELP HOMELESS VETS AND BUILD A COMMUNITY. >> JUST AS THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE BUILT THE ACTUAL VILLEAG IN WHICH OUR VETERANS LIVE, WE HAVE HAD A FEW PEOPLE WHO COME HERE AND WORK ON

Veterans Community Project puts the finishing touches on Hearts Parade registration

The VCP said its heart will be placed on its campus on Troost Avenue

We are just days away from kicking off the Parade of Hearts in Kansas City. The huge public art project includes more than 150 original works of art. The Veteran Community Project puts the finishing touches on its heart. It’s a nod to the organization, our military and the community. From symbols of love and unity to honoring Kansas City and the people and pets found there, there is something for everyone at the Parade of Hearts. “Artists have done amazing things with them. Some people have painted them, others have made large sculptures out of them, and ours is a mosaic,” said Kelly Seward, director of communications for the Veterans Community Project. veterans community project is in the process of completing its heart. small houses, the community center on one side, “said Seward. It is one of 154 hearts about to be placed on the other side brings special meaning to VCP’s mission to help homeless vets and build community.” Just as we’ve had thousands of people build the village our veterans live in, we’ve had quite a few people who came here and worked on this mosaic,” Seward says. VCP sai d heart will be placed on its campus on Troost Avenue. may.

We are only a few days away from parade of hearts kickoff in Kansas City. The huge public art project includes more than 150 original works of art.

the Veterans Community Project puts the finishing touches to his heart. It’s a nod to the organization, our military and the community.

From symbols of love and unity to honoring Kansas City, its people and its pets, there’s something for everyone at the Parade of Hearts.

“Artists have done amazing things with their hearts. Some people have painted them, others have made large sculptures out of them, and ours is a mosaic,” said Kelly Seward, communications director for the Veterans Community Project.

The Veterans Community Project completes its core.

“We have the little houses, the community center on one side,” Seward said.

It is one of 154 hearts about to be placed on the other side of the subway.

“And the houses are all colored according to the different branches of the military,” Seward said.

The project brings special meaning to VCP’s mission to help homeless vets and build community.

“Just as thousands of people built the village that our veterans live in, we’ve had quite a few people who have come here and worked on this mosaic,” Seward said.

VCP said the heart will be placed on its campus on Troost Avenue. You will be able to see it and the other 153 hearts through the metro until May.

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KC Veterans Community Project Calls for Volunteers to Plow Snow https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kc-veterans-community-project-calls-for-volunteers-to-plow-snow/ Thu, 17 Feb 2022 20:35:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kc-veterans-community-project-calls-for-volunteers-to-plow-snow/ The snowstorm that hit Kansas City completely blanketed the Veterans Community Project Village. The organization says village vets cannot safely exit until the aisles are cleared. The village has 49 small houses and a 4,600 square foot community center built specifically for homeless veterans. The VCP is asking all volunteers willing to come with shovels […]]]>

The snowstorm that hit Kansas City completely blanketed the Veterans Community Project Village. The organization says village vets cannot safely exit until the aisles are cleared. The village has 49 small houses and a 4,600 square foot community center built specifically for homeless veterans. The VCP is asking all volunteers willing to come with shovels or other snow removal equipment to come and help. “If you have 4WD and can get to 8825 Troost Ave. between 2 and 4 pm safely, we would greatly appreciate the help!” the VCP tweeted on Thursday. The entire village was built to help homeless Kansas City veterans get back on their feet, as the VCP offers education, health and wellness, and case management programs to help homeless veterans get back on their feet. obtain the stability needed to find permanent housing solutions. to drop any veteran through the cracks. From providing housing to offering walk-in support services, we are here for anyone who has taken an oath to serve America,” the VCP states on its website. In 2019, to celebrate the completion of the village, VCP donors held a Christmas lights celebration for the community.

The snowstorm that hit Kansas City completely blanketed the Veterans Community Project Village. The organization says village vets cannot safely exit until the aisles are cleared.

The village has 49 small houses and a 4,600 square foot community center built specifically for homeless veterans. The VCP is asking all volunteers willing to come with shovels or other snow removal equipment to come and help.

“If you have 4WD and can get to 8825 Troost Ave. between 2 and 4 pm safely, we would greatly appreciate the help!” the VCP tweeted on Thursday.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, on their website.

The entire village was built to help homeless Kansas City veterans get back on their feet, as the VCP offers education, health and wellness, and case management programs to help homeless veterans get back on their feet. obtain the stability needed to find permanent housing solutions.

“The Veterans Community Project refuses to let a veteran fall through the cracks. Whether it’s providing housing or offering walk-in support services, we’re here for anyone who’s loaned oath to serve America,” the VCP states on its website.

In 2019, to celebrate the completion of the village, VCP donors held a Christmas lights celebration for the community.

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“Valentine’s Day for Veterans” Community Service Day scheduled for January 29 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/valentines-day-for-veterans-community-service-day-scheduled-for-january-29/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 16:25:22 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/valentines-day-for-veterans-community-service-day-scheduled-for-january-29/ On January 29, a large group of volunteers will meet again at the Red Bank Community Center to make Valentine’s Day cards for veterans. This special began in 1989 when former Red Bank High School teacher Linda “Link” Sparks assigned her students the task of writing a friendly letter of thanks on Valentine’s Day to […]]]>

On January 29, a large group of volunteers will meet again at the Red Bank Community Center to make Valentine’s Day cards for veterans.

This special began in 1989 when former Red Bank High School teacher Linda “Link” Sparks assigned her students the task of writing a friendly letter of thanks on Valentine’s Day to the three veterans of Red Bank High School.

The following year, the fathers, brothers and neighbors of several of his students were deployed to the Middle East to serve in Operation Desert Storm. Mrs. Sparks got their addresses and every Friday her students wrote them friendly letters. On Valentine’s Day, the students made them valentines. When the veterans returned from overseas, the whole group came to their classroom and thanked the students for writing to them and sending them a Valentine’s Day card.

Ms. Sparks retired in 2014 after thirty-three years of teaching, but her Valentine’s Day efforts for veterans continue to this day. The first year after she retired and had no more students to help her, Sparks, her husband and daughter created and sent over 400 Valentine’s Day cards. Realizing the enormity of the project, Sparks’ daughter went in search of volunteers. “The following year she asked for help on Facebook and our community opened their arms and embraced this little program,” Sparks said.

The Valentine’s Day recipient list for veterans now has nearly 1,200 veterans — 500 cards go to individual veterans and 700 cards go to various veteran organizations. To meet every demand, more than fifty volunteers attend one of two Community Service Days at Red Bank’s Joe Glasscock Community Center each year. Participants also volunteer for a stuffing day, where all cards, children’s letters and the overview are organized into envelopes and boxes. Different people come to work on different days.

“Each homemade card includes an original poem written by a Hamilton County student and a letter of appreciation from an elementary school student,” Sparks said. “We ask each child to include the return address from school on their letter so that the veteran can write them a note. Also, the person making the card writes the veterans a short letter or note.

Sparks said she received boxes full of thank you notes from veterans, many of whom say this is the first time they have been thanked for their service. Some of the notes were very touching and Sparks shared them with his students so they would know how much their words meant to a treasured veteran. It also posts the letters received during community service days so that volunteers can see that what they are doing is important.

“I’m very proud of Valentines for Veterans: Operation Love,” said Sparks. “I think it touched a lot of lives, especially some treasured veterans. I am convinced that each of us can do something to help these men and women who have sworn to defend this country at the cost of their lives. I can say “Thank you” by making homemade cards. What can others do?

If you would like to volunteer and participate in Valentine’s Day for Veterans, the next Community Service Day will be Saturday, January 29 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Joe Glasscock Community Center at 3620 Tom Weathers Drive in Red Bank. More details can be found on Facebook @LinkRaulstonSparks.

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Loveland veterans and community members gather for 80th anniversary of Pearl Harbor attack – Loveland Reporter-Herald https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/loveland-veterans-and-community-members-gather-for-80th-anniversary-of-pearl-harbor-attack-loveland-reporter-herald/ Tue, 07 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/loveland-veterans-and-community-members-gather-for-80th-anniversary-of-pearl-harbor-attack-loveland-reporter-herald/ Nearly a century ago, Loveland resident and World War II veteran George Norton was on a ship near the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa. On Tuesday night, nearly 80 years after he joined the Navy to fight in the war, he stood with his community to remember those who died in Hawaii in the attack that […]]]>

Nearly a century ago, Loveland resident and World War II veteran George Norton was on a ship near the Japanese prefecture of Okinawa. On Tuesday night, nearly 80 years after he joined the Navy to fight in the war, he stood with his community to remember those who died in Hawaii in the attack that dragged America in the fray.

“It was really great to see these people come out,” he said with a big smile, looking around the crowd gathered in the cold at Dwayne Webster Veterans Park, named after a Loveland sailor who died during of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Loveland veterans and community members gathered on the chilly Tuesday evening for another year to remember the attack on Pearl Harbor; 2021 marks the 80th anniversary of the attack.

This year’s commemoration brought back old traditions as well as new aspects of the celebration. In addition to the candles distributed to residents during the event, many of those gathered received a special button made by Loveland’s Veterans Memorial President Tony DuMosch.

Those gathered also heard from guest speakers such as local Loveland veteran historian and storyteller Brad Hoopes, and watched as the Flatirons Young Marines presented the colors to the crowd.

For those gathered, between veterans and young recruits, the event was one more year to honor those who had lost their lives and ensure that the day that lives in infamy will never be forgotten.

DuMosch said that, as in the past, it’s important to make sure this day is remembered so that those who died are never forgotten, especially as more veterans of the World War II die.

“Significance is the value of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness,” he said. “If we don’t remember these events…we are forced to repeat them and find ourselves in situations we don’t want to be in.”

Norton, who served in the US Navy from 1943 to 1973, shared a similar sentiment, noting the importance of remembering. Norton served for many years during the war on a ship carrying war cargo. He said that in May 1945 his ship shot down several Japanese bombers, one of which crashed into the side of the ship. The accident, he said, caused a fire which they had to put out.

Flatiron Young Marines Lance Cpl. Hudson Hamack, 10, proudly holds a piece of the USS Arizona so people can touch it Tuesday, Dec. 7, 2021, during the Pearl Harbor Remembrance Ceremony at Dwayne Webster Veterans Park in Loveland. Flatiron Young Marines Lance Cpl. Carson Boyd, 10, left, looks over Hudson’s shoulder to see the piece of the ship. (Jenny Sparks/Loveland Reporter-Herald)

“They filled it with water and battened down the hatches to get under way,” he said, recalling his time in the war.

Norton said events like the one held on Tuesday night in Loveland must happen every year, adding “we should never forget”. He was made even happier by the young residents who came to remember the attack and honor those who lost their lives.

But for others in the community, including young children interested in serving, the importance was to honor those around them and make sure they remember what happened even if it happened. is produced long before they are born.

Carson Boyd, a 10-year-old member of the Flatirons Young Marines, said his presence on Tuesday night was particularly important to him because he is named after his great-great-grandfather who was in the Navy when the attack took place. of Pearl Harbor.

“I think it’s very important because I have a very long line of veterans and I miss my grandfather who was in Pearl Harbor because I never got to meet him,” he said. declared.

“It’s very important for our younger generation to carry on our history and remember where we came from and understand what happened,” said Boyd’s mother and Young Marines volunteer Phylicia Guerrero.

One of Boyd’s Young Marine mates, 10-year-old Hudson Hamack, stood next to a half-raised American flag during part of the ceremony, holding a piece of the USS Arizona and standing beside of a replica of the sunken ship. .

“It’s really awesome,” said Hamack, who held the piece of history because he’s the youngest in the group. “It means a lot to me because it’s a huge piece of America’s history.”

Hoopes said Pearl Harbor was “like a huge rock that was thrown into a pond” that caused ripples emanating even 80 years later to the present day.

“We must never forget those millions of people who rode over the splashes and big ripples during the war,” he said.

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The Genesis of the Veterans Community Park | News https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/the-genesis-of-the-veterans-community-park-news/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 05:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/the-genesis-of-the-veterans-community-park-news/ Over the past year, the Town of Marco Island has embarked on two major projects to improve the town’s infrastructure. Like many projects, these infrastructure projects sat in the planning stage for decades, until the city solicited bids and awarded contracts. In this edition, we’ll take a look at one of these two projects, to […]]]>

Over the past year, the Town of Marco Island has embarked on two major projects to improve the town’s infrastructure. Like many projects, these infrastructure projects sat in the planning stage for decades, until the city solicited bids and awarded contracts.

In this edition, we’ll take a look at one of these two projects, to provide an understanding of both the history and current status of the project. The second infrastructure project will be highlighted in the next edition of Coastal Breeze News.

Purchase of the Glon property

One of Marco Island’s oldest infrastructure projects is the Veterans Community Park, located on land that was once known as the Glon property. Shortly after Marco Island was incorporated, the city had the opportunity to purchase the Glon property. In a referendum vote, the citizens of Marco chose to purchase $10,000,000 of land as they looked to the future of the island.

The city’s purchase of the property made it one of the last remaining areas on the island that could be used for public gatherings, rather than commercial development.

Public use of the park

Following the removal of construction debris from the controversial Septic Tank Removal Program (STRP) and the upgrading of Collier Boulevard, citizens enjoyed the property’s first real public use at the annual Ceremony and Celebration of Christmas tree lighting. The Christmas Island style committee requested the use of the newly grassed area for the lighting of the Christmas tree, when the popular event moved beyond its original location at the downtown shopping centre.

Since that time, approximately 3,500 residents and guests gather at Veterans Community Park each year for the annual Christmas tree lighting ceremony and celebration. Last year was an exception, however, as the event was canceled due to COVID precautions. (This year, with construction underway in the park, the annual tree lighting celebration will take place at Mackle Park.)

The Christmas Island Style Committee also sponsors an annual Movie by the Tree event at Veterans’ Community Park. (This year, the Movie by the Tree will take place at Mackle Park, the temporary location of the Christmas tree.)

Using the area for the seasonal Farmer’s Market is another successful venture, which continues to grow and thrive in the park. Held every Wednesday from November to the end of April, it is also one of the most anticipated events of this period.

The park served as the setting for the annual Seafood and Music Festival, a major event that has taken place there for many years. This annual three to four day event is sponsored by the island’s two Rotary clubs and the Kiwanis club as one of the major fundraisers to support their philanthropic efforts on the island.

The Veterans Community Park has hosted several other events, such as fundraisers for the YMCA, Erin’s Sons and Daughters, various arts and crafts fairs, and city-sponsored concerts.

Veterans Memorial and Liberty Fountain

The local VFW created a fundraiser that successfully created the park’s original veterans memorial. The memorial is located in an area of ​​the park that was part of the original master plan and for which the city spent $100,000 in 2008. The Veterans Memorial was dedicated on November 11, 2011 at the Veterans Day Community Gathering veterans to thank its veterans for their service.

The American Legion Post (established after the local VFW post was absorbed by a post in Golden Gate) continues this effort. As a result, the Liberty Fountain was erected and other minor improvements were added over time.

Veterans Community Park has hosted the Vietnam Memorial Wall tour three times, drawing thousands to Marco Island to see the mock-up of the same memorial that stands in Washington, D.C.






Veterans Park Seafood Party

Veterans Community Park seen before construction began and at the start of construction.



Revisit the original plan

In 2018, after a new board was put in place, they voted to spend an additional $100,000 to revise the park’s original plan, created by Kimley-Horn. In 2019, the city council again heard from Kimley-Horn representative James Pankonin regarding the updated vision for the property, which had been purchased 20 years earlier. Amazingly, the original vision, created a decade before, would essentially remain the same. In 2021, councilors voted to use a “construction manager at risk” process, hiring Manhattan Construction to oversee the project. Once again, the city engaged Kimley-Horn to work with Manhattan Construction to develop construction plans for the project.

Earlier this fall, work began to prepare the site for the estimated year-long project to develop the park. It is expected to be ready in late fall 2022.

Project costs

The cost of Manhattan Construction’s contract to serve as Construction Manager at Risk is $11,183,647.00. An additional $713,700.00 was paid for work done on the second master plan, plus construction document creation work by Kimley-Horn. The 2008 master plan documents cost the city an additional $100,000 when they were created. This will cost the park just under $12,000,000, assuming there are no unforeseen circumstances.

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Veteran Community Project Expands to St. Louis, Oklahoma City While Remaining Committed to KC https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veteran-community-project-expands-to-st-louis-oklahoma-city-while-remaining-committed-to-kc/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/veteran-community-project-expands-to-st-louis-oklahoma-city-while-remaining-committed-to-kc/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022. The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022.

The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help make the announcement on Twitter and YouTube.

The Veterans Community Project works to fill the gaps veterans often face after being discharged from the military.

Since its creation in 2015, the association has built a community of dozens of small houses at East 89th Street and Troost Avenue in Kansas City. Homeless veterans can live in the houses while they work to get back on their feet. They also have access to the group’s walk-in center and a bus stop. the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority provides free transportation for veterans.

The project is also in the midst of a fundraising campaign to build what it calls a new “Sailing Campus.” When the building is complete, the organization will be able to provide financial management, job search, access to mental health care and other needs for veterans.

Those needs came in the form of preparing for a harsh winter Thursday morning. A mobile “stand down” unit has been deployed inside the Veterans Awareness Center. Volunteers and community partners distributed winter coats, boots and other clothing that men and women will need over the next few weeks.

Employment Services, Legal Assistance, and even the VA Medical Center were also on hand at the event to provide free flu shots, COVID-19 reminders, and help finding jobs.

“We are extremely proud of what we have done here in Kansas City. It’s the flagship and it’s where it all began, it’s the heart and soul of the Veterans Community Project. The possibility of broadcasting this project across the country is a joy. Seeing each city take ownership of the project is what makes us successful,” said Vincent Morales, co-founder of the Veterans Community Project.

If you are a veteran in need of assistance or would like to learn more about the group, the Veterans Community Project website has additional information.

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Kansas City Veterans Community Project Announces Expansion https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-announces-expansion/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://unitedchildrenofveterans.com/kansas-city-veterans-community-project-announces-expansion/ KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022. The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help […]]]>

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — An organization founded by a group of veterans in Kansas City has announced it will expand to more than half a dozen cities, including St. Louis and Oklahoma City, by the end of 2022.

The Veterans Community Project turned to former NBA and University of Kansas star Nick Collison to help make the announcement on Twitter and YouTube.

The Veterans Community Project works to fill the gaps veterans often face after being discharged from the military.

Since its inception in 2015, the nonprofit has built a community of dozens of tiny homes at East 89th Street and Troost Avenue in Kansas City. Homeless veterans can live in the houses while they work to get back on their feet. They also have access to the group’s drop-in center and a bus stop. the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority provides free transportation for veterans.

The project is also in the midst of a fundraising campaign to build what it calls a new “shipping campus”. When the building is complete, the organization will be able to provide financial management, job search, access to mental health care and other needs for veterans.

Those needs came in the form of preparing for a harsh winter Thursday morning. A mobile “stand down” unit has been deployed inside the Veterans Awareness Center. Volunteers and community partners distributed winter coats, boots and other clothing that men and women will need over the next few weeks.

Employment Services, Legal Assistance, and even the VA Medical Center were also on hand at the event to provide free flu shots, COVID-19 reminders, and help finding jobs.

“We are extremely proud of what we have done here in Kansas City. It’s the flagship and it’s where it all began, it’s the heart and soul of the Veterans Community Project. The possibility of broadcasting this project across the country is a joy. Seeing each city take ownership of the project is what makes us successful,” said Vincent Morales, co-founder of the Veterans Community Project.

If you are a veteran in need of assistance or would like to learn more about the group, the Veterans Community Project website has additional information.

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